Category: artwork

11 Sep 2017
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Copperwood – New Modern House 1

We are happy to report that Copperwood – New Modern House 1 has weathered its first year of occupancy.   Our clients for this brand-new design/build project have lived in the home since October 2016 and we are looking forward to being featured on the AIA Indianapolis Home Tour in late September 2017.  It’s always great to see old friends and meet new ones at the show, so we hope you’ll stop by for a visit!  Check out the project page for the story.

08 Aug 2017
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Sneak Peek

Here is a sneak peek of New Modern House Ditch located on Ditch Road north of 96th (a couple lots north of the big radio tower).  Owners have lived in the home since late 2016 and are settling-in.  Landscaping and furnishings are taking root and we look forward to sharing more in the coming months!

10 Mar 2017
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WRTV-6 Home Tour

Broad Ripple Bungalow featured in WRTV-6 HOME TOUR today – check out the link right here!

WRTV-6 Home Tour - Photo by Laura Olive
WRTV-6 Home Tour – Deborah and Alan’s favorite elements in their home are the exposed white beams and skylights. This view is from their daughter’s playroom loft.  Photo by Laura Olive (WRTV Contributor)
29 Oct 2016
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Dining Room

We have completed some new photos in the Dining Room and other areas for the Classic Irvington Modern Tudor project.  We will be posting more updates in the near future, so stay-tuned for more #modern #interiors.

The front area of this labor-of-love has remained virtually unchanged since 2002, having been part of the initial Phase One work that was started in 1998.  Dining chairs are Jacobsen Series 7 with custom-made dining table by WERK | Building Modern.  Buffet table is from IKEA, and the Eames Lounge and Ottoman with black leather and Cherry veneer acquired from Herman Miller in 1994.  The two large art pieces were commissioned from local artist, Kyle Ragsdale in 2005 – the blue and yellow oil pieces on canvas were artist’s interpretations of desired color palette, size, and theme for each piece, which had predetermined locations in-mind.

16 Sep 2016
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Vibrant Playful Home Creative Family Indianapolis

Very nice article from Design Sponge about Broad Ripple Bungalow – A Vibrant, Playful Home for a Creative Family in Indianapolis.

 

Article by Kate Oliver

When San Francisco transplants Alan and Deborah Leerkamp decided to lay down roots in the Midwest with young daughter Samuelle, they knew they’d be hard-pressed to find an open-concept home in a neighborhood where the vast majority of homes built in the 20s and 30s have remained untouched. Instead, they focused their efforts on finding a house in the best location: a place close to school and work with a strong sense of community, where they could walk or bike just about anywhere they needed to go.

Just a few miles north of a vibrant, rapidly shifting downtown Indianapolis, IN lies Broad Ripple Village, a walkable community long known for its tree-lined streets and traditional homes with coffee, groceries, breweries, and a great spot to brunch right around the corner. After finding a 1920s Craftsman in the heart of the neighborhood, Deborah, an art director and designer, began planning and sketching an entirely new layout that worked for their family and lifestyle — although you’d never guess such a colorful, open space was behind the front door of the quaint bungalow.

With the help of a local architect, Deborah’s vision for a welcoming, modern home came to life. By opening up the attic, exposing beams, and tearing out walls, she created a unified space that invited conversation and quality time for the close-knit family of three; a lively home where Samuelle would love growing up. The couple added unexpected, playful elements they dreamed of having in their own childhoods: a secret treehouse loft accessed by a rope ladder and a big yellow tube slide from the main level to the basement playroom for Samuelle and her friends (and sometimes adults, too!). The main living quarters consist of the open-concept great room, two bedrooms, bathrooms, and an office that feels proportionate to their family on a daily basis, but their nest can expand when the family needs a little extra space. A creative room with soaring ceilings connects the main house to a private guest loft for visiting family and friends.

The Leerkamps have created a home that is honest, approachable, and so uniquely them — a home that not only serves their needs, but one that brings them true joy. Their home is a reflection of who they are: welcoming, genuine, and warm people who seek a life well-lived. It serves as a reminder to break the rules sometimes, to create homes that truly represent who we are and make us smile when we open the door after a long day. —Kate

Design Sponge - Vibrant Playful Home Creative Family Indianapolis - Kate Oliver
Design Sponge – Vibrant Playful Home Creative Family Indianapolis – Kate Oliver
01 May 2016
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Featured in May 2016 Indy Monthly

HAUS’ Broad Ripple Bungalow is featured in May 2016 Indy Monthly Magazine.  Check out the spread here and scroll down.  Check-out the online magazine link here.

Tinker Time

San Francisco transplants turn the interior of a 1920s bungalow into their own Broad Ripple playground.

By Taylor Ellis

Photography by Tony Valainis

When Deborah Jacobs and Alan Leerkamp moved to Indy from California, they captured Broad Ripple’s playful, artsy spirit in their bungalow just south of the main strip like they’d been living in the area for years.  That’s what happens – even if unintentionally – when great creative minds collaborate:  Deborah, an art director and designer who has refurbished the homes of Google employees, partnered with HAUS, a local architecture studio with a contemporary edge, on a six-month renovation project.  “They really get it,” says Chris Short, principal architect at HAUS.  “Most people don’t have those kinds of [creative] interests and skills.  We were speaking the same language.”

24 Feb 2016
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POP ART Apartment Therapy

HAUS’ Broad Ripple Bungalow POP ART Apartment Therapy featured in article.  Check out the link!

10 Innovative Ways to Decorate w Ladders + POP ART
POP ART Apartment Therapy
14 Jan 2016
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11 Dreamy Master Suites

Article:  11 Dreamy Master Suites – Shabby Chic Master Bedroom Suite in HAUS’ Broad Ripple Bungalow featured in article, “11 Parental Suites of our Dreams” (interpretation).  Suites of differing styles from around the world are highlighted – check out the article here.

Interpreted Text Below:

11 Parental Suites of our Dreams

And if parents finally had the right to their own space for cocooning?

The Romantic Suite:

The decorative element of strength in this Shabby Chic bedroom suite is of course the raw barn door.  Sanded and whitened to match the minimalist and romantic style of the room, she separates the sleeping quarters from the spa.  The white walls and big mirrors placed behind the bed bring in a light that almost seems poetic.  We will particularly salute the ingenious sliding door system that allows for a flexible gain of space.

 

20 Aug 2015
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HAUS Featured in Wall Street Journal Article about Foyers

HAUS Interior Project focusing on Foyers, Entrances, and Hallways, has been featured in the Wall Street Journal – here is the text of the article written by Alina Dizik.

 

“In Luxury Homes, Foyers Get Functional—and Fabulous

Irked by what they see as wasted space, some luxury homeowners are asking designers to reimagine home entryways

Entryways and hallways are often an afterthought for home buyers. Now, some homeowners are asking designers to reimagine them as versatile spaces. Photo: Drew Kelly for The Wall Street Journal

By ALINA DIZIK

Updated Aug. 20, 2015 1:53 p.m. ET

15 COMMENTS

When Gary Loeb and David Fraze host a party in their 1897 Elizabethan home in San Francisco, many guests barely get past the front door. Instead they gather inside the wood-paneled foyer, which has 16-foot ceilings, an original fireplace and a vintage rug. “A lot of people just spend half the party standing in the foyer,” says Mr. Loeb, a 46-year-old executive for a health technology firm.

Long the doormat of home design, entryways and hallways are often an afterthought for home buyers, who typically spend their money on other rooms. In a recent survey at The Wall Street Journal’s request, 46% of respondents on home-design website Houzz.com said hallways are the most overlooked spaces when decorating a home.

Now, irked by what they see as wasted space, some homeowners are asking designers to reimagine entryways as versatile spaces that double as dining rooms, dens and entertaining spaces. “People are not just hanging art on the walls and walking through,” says Jennifer Roberts, an associate broker with the Fisher Roberts team at Engel & Völkers in New York.

When renovating their Sacramento, Calif., home, Randy Reynoso and Martin Camsey removed part of a wall to open up the entryway and create a homey feel where the two would want to linger. The long staircase in their Monterey Colonial-style home now has a custom wrought-iron railing and a vintage French chandelier that can be mechanically lowered for cleaning. The foyer also includes a powder room, and shelving in a seating area holds Longfellow’s “The Song of Hiawatha” and other vintage tomes from Mr. Reynoso’s great-grandmother’s library. “We reimagined what [the foyer] would look like in 1928,” when the house was built, said Mr. Reynoso, a 57-year-old financial institution executive who worked with local interior designer Curtis Popp on the project. He estimates the foyer cost about $35,000 to create.

Modern, open-plan architecture poses a particular challenge for clients looking to bring back that Old World grandeur of entrances, says Gisue Hariri, co-founder of an architecture and interior-design firm in New York. “Historically, entrances were very much celebrated,” says Ms. Hariri. “In general, we try to make sure these neglected areas do make a comeback.”

In newer condos that lack formal entryways, Ms. Hariri suggests a partial wall to create an intimate space with a gallery feel when walking in the front door. For a client in Manhattan’s Sutton Place neighborhood, she created a wall that features a modern mural of walking figures by artist Julian Opie. Other wall designs by Ms. Hariri also include hidden storage—a way to keep clutter to a minimum without adding extra furniture.

Foyers, Entrances, Hallways - Wall Street Journal
In his Indianapolis home, Phil Salsbery created a faux hallway with cabinetry to help define the home’s living area.  Foyers, Entrances, Hallways – CHRIS SMITH FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

 

In Indianapolis, Phil Salsbery created a false hallway using cabinetry with hidden, built-in storage. The new corridor allows access to the master bedroom without cutting through the living room, where someone may be relaxing and watching television. The hallway cabinets provide much-needed storage space, since the condo has many floor-to-ceiling windows, says Mr. Salsbery, 52-years-old and owner of an investment firm. He also worked with designer Chris Short to create a circular entryway, with a blue-lighted ceiling, that leads to the false hallway. “It creates a spectacular entrance that cuts the harshness of the angles” in the home, says Mr. Salsbery, who estimates that he spent $50,000 on building out the hallway and foyer.

Ms. Roberts, the New York broker, says sellers see more value in homes where transitional spaces have been put to work. A recent buyer turned the hallway between a two bedrooms into a den with a television. She has also seen homes where owners used a spacious entryway for formal dining. When selling a home, Ms. Roberts tells clients to be more creative when showing off their foyers and hallways. “You should definitely stage it so people can see how they should be utilizing it,” she says.

Regardless how foyers are used, they still need to make a good first impression. Melody Adhami, a 34-year-old who runs a mobile-app agency, says the foyer in her Toronto home is the one room that’s off limits to her two young children. The space is often used for side conversations when guests come over and has an oversize velvet ottoman and art created from metal disks, along with a console table for a wow factor when guests enter, she says. “It’s not necessarily used by the kids, so we could do nicer things,” says Ms. Adhami, who worked with designer Ines Mazzotta but declined to disclose costs.

Pamela O’Banion, a 62-year-old homemaker, wanted to create a sense of surprise when guests entered her 1,500-square-foot Nob Hill condo with views of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge. First, she and her designer, Matthew Turner, closed up several doorways that led to other rooms and painted the walls a dark green to better define the entryway. Then they added dimly lighted sconces, a woven Versailles-style parquet floor and gilded furniture for a sense of romance. In all, the entryway project cost about $50,000.

“I wanted [visitors] to think they were walking into a jewel box,” she says.

Corrections & Amplifications: 
Jennifer Roberts is an associate broker with the Fisher Roberts team at Engel & Völkers in New York. An earlier version of this article incorrectly misspelled the firm as Fischer Roberts. (8/20/2015)”