24 Jun 2017
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Simple Modern Bedroom Wing

Simple Modern Bedroom Wing elevates over the landscape at dawn.  We are preparing this project for the upcoming home tour this fall, so if you are interested in seeing the project first-hand, please stay tuned.  It sits on 20 acres and is not visible from any public street, so this is the time to experience #copperwood!

20 May 2017
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Midcentury Move In

Midcentury Move In is 95% complete – exterior hardscape, southside privacy fence, exterior painting, porch screens, and landscaping along with some interior odds and ends are all that remain.  Substantial completion has been achieved (this means the project is available for its intended use).  It’s an exciting time on West 81st Street!

13 May 2017
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Flood Zone Prototype

New flood zone prototype design for a series of #modern #homes coming to a location near you.  We are planning to start with the first two of seven units in 2017 in a prime location in Marion County.  Stay tuned for design and construction updates to come.

03 May 2017
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Construction Progress

We have a lot of projects underway with construction progress to report.  This project, New Modern House 3 located in Chicago, is coming along slowly but surely.  Original cement board siding has been substituted with brick masonry which is currently in-progress.  The original color palette remains intact and the dark colored brick was a nice choice.  Please check back for new updates as we try to keep up with all the new project news!

 

25 Apr 2017
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Colonial Modern

New Colonial Modern home to break ground this summer 2017 in Town Oak Estates, Carmel just north of Coxhill Gardens.  We have made efforts to stay within the spirit of the neighborhood covenants while offering our clients a touch of modern sophistication reflecting their personal tastes.  Front elevation is highlighted by a modern entry featuring wood-clad Pooja/home office.  We will have the project page up-and-running soon, so please check back for updates.

21 Apr 2017
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Midcentury Closet Detail

This Midcentury closet detail is one of many refined retro-modern features at Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 in Williams Creek area.  Spring has sprung and Owner has moved-into the project even while mostly exterior work continues forward.  Happy Earth Day!

02 Apr 2017
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Modern Entry

The modern entry at Treesdale is looking good this spring.  Landscaping and some other new enhancements are in-process.  The work often isn’t always 100% complete at move-in.  Sometimes getting moved-in is just the first milestone;  then from there, the finishing-touches continue.  Frequently, future phases are planned from the very beginning to anticipate evolving lifestyles and budgets.  We like to think of the design/construction process as more analogous to a marathon than sprint, so physical and emotional endurance is a valuable quality (for both the vendors and the clients).  The rewards of tailored living await you at the finish line!

10 Mar 2017
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WRTV-6 Home Tour

Broad Ripple Bungalow featured in WRTV-6 HOME TOUR today – check out the link right here!

WRTV-6 Home Tour - Photo by Laura Olive
WRTV-6 Home Tour – Deborah and Alan’s favorite elements in their home are the exposed white beams and skylights. This view is from their daughter’s playroom loft.  Photo by Laura Olive (WRTV Contributor)
08 Feb 2017
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Keep Chopping Wood

Keep on chopping wood at Copperwood – client living the dream taking advantage of a warm February day – little farmhouse in the distance.  Check out the latest updates to the project page here.

This project was designed by HAUS and built by WERK | Building Modern, our sister construction management company.  It is interesting to compare the projects we build versus the ones we do not build.  This project is one of the most successful realizations of Architect’s design intent of all of our recent projects.  Design concepts and alternatives along the way received the benefit of Architect daily oversight and clear communication at each step of the process, which is a major benefit of direct collaboration between Architect, trade contractors, and Owner.  Direct, clear communication by less parties may also translate into less time, less cost, and higher quality.

15 Dec 2016
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Midcentury Entry

Midcentury Entry at New Modern House Ditch Road is nearing completion.  Thermally-treated wood strikes again, in this case, thermally-treated Poplar makes an appearance.  Check out the project page here.

New Modern House Ditch - Midcentury Entry Porch Progress
New Modern House Ditch – Midcentury Entry Porch Progress

Thermal modifying wood is a technology that improves the resilience of wood products used in exterior conditions and can be used on most wood species.  Our client at #Copperwood inquired about the technology and if we could use it at their home – which we did.  On that project, we used thermally-modified Ash.  Client for this project was so impressed by the beauty and resilience after visiting Copperwood, they requested something like it here – in this case, thermally-modifed Poplar was used, provided by a local source who learned about the technology from HAUS/Copperwood.

09 Dec 2016
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Slow Architecture

Slow Architecture – We are intrigued by this article about “Slow Philosophy – doing things at the right speed/pace” and how it may apply to architecture.  We are saving it here for future reference.  It’s true that American society always seems in a big rush, and we sometimes feel pressured to go faster and faster.  Is faster better, or is it better to savor the journey, not just the finish line?

Check it out here via DWELL

Slow Architecture - Therme Vals / Designed by architect Peter Zumthor
Slow Architecture – Therme Vals / Designed by architect Peter Zumthor

The Time, Cost, Quality trio is always a valuable thing to discuss with our clients.  Do they want it fast and cheap?  If yes, then the quality is going to be low.  Do they want high quality and a reasonable price?  Then time may be the sacrifice.  As with all design + construction projects, one needs to find the right balance of client priorities translated into the dream and then executed accordingly in built form.

15 Nov 2016
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Scandinavian Rustic Interior

This Scandinavian Rustic Interior project in Carmel is coming along nicely and our clients have been a privilege to work with.  Phase One interior architecture has been completed, and now interior furnishings have been ordered.  Photo below is a detail of the new steel-clad stair and steel-glass rail system.  Check out a sneak-peek of the project story right here!

This home was originally built by the client’s father in the early 1990’s.  It is quaint shingle-style home utilizing real Poplar log-framed structure and perimeter walls, which have become a major design element in the space.  Transformed from a semi-dark rustic cabin to a Scandinavian Rustic light-filled dream dwelling, we are headed in the right direction!  Please check out the project as we will be posting updates as available.

29 Oct 2016
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Dining Room

We have completed some new photos in the Dining Room and other areas for the Classic Irvington Modern Tudor project.  We will be posting more updates in the near future, so stay-tuned for more #modern #interiors.

The front area of this labor-of-love has remained virtually unchanged since 2002, having been part of the initial Phase One work that was started in 1998.  Dining chairs are Jacobsen Series 7 with custom-made dining table by WERK | Building Modern.  Buffet table is from IKEA, and the Eames Lounge and Ottoman with black leather and Cherry veneer acquired from Herman Miller in 1994.  The two large art pieces were commissioned from local artist, Kyle Ragsdale in 2005 – the blue and yellow oil pieces on canvas were artist’s interpretations of desired color palette, size, and theme for each piece, which had predetermined locations in-mind.

15 Oct 2016
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Architectural Stair

Architectural Stair progress at Copperwood.  #ash #thermallymodified #stairlights #modern #architecture

To the left we were able to utilize the same thermally-modified Ash that was used for exterior cladding of bedroom and garage.  Then for the treads and risers, we used 2x structural pine to compliment the Ash and blend with the pine beams in the adjacent living space.  Handrail and guardrail above is black painted steel, and the translucent wall to the right is acrylic screwed to painted Poplar-wrapped studs (provides safety and diffused light).  Stair lights are evenly-spaced LED discs, connected to whole house lighting and smart-home system controlled via client’s smart devices.

13 Oct 2016
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Thanks, Henrybuilt

Thanks, Henrybuilt, for recommending HAUS to new from out-of-town clients.  We look forward to collaborating with Henrybuilt in the very near future for some expert, fully integrated “systems design”.

Henrybuilt
Images and text below are taken from Henrybuilt website

From Henrybuilt:

Henrybuilt is a design-driven company. We focus on the ‘whole solution’ – the integration of aesthetics, function, craft quality and your experience living with our product.

We design and build our products for those who are looking for that ‘just right’ feeling. Not only in terms of how things look, but in how the most important parts of a home work, wear and feel – every day.

The ‘just right’ feeling of Henrybuilt kitchens comes from a unique combination of system design, made-to-order personalization, and overall quality, which has helped position Henrybuilt among the top kitchen system companies in the world.

Sophisticated homeowners and architects are increasingly seeking the combined design and functionality of a high quality ‘system’ or ‘performance’ kitchen.

A system kitchen is the result of a seamless blend of industrial design and overall performance engineering that cannot be achieved through a traditional cabinetmaking approach. And when expertly done, the ‘system’ is invisible.

But, of course, most of us who want the benefits of a system also want flexibility and a customized solution – including the ability to adapt and integrate architecturally.

This is why Henrybuilt exists; to give you a complete solution, total quality, and a customized outcome.

The result is more architecturally integrated than other systems… and built to last.

An elegant space, designed for real life.
Not fragile or delicate, and intuitive and natural to use.

And not just for the kitchen, but for the whole house. Roughly half of our projects involve almost every room in the home.

We have completed over 3500 projects throughout North America, and each of them is completely unique.

We provide an expert, tightly focused design service that fits in well with the services provided by most architects and designers. We can also work directly with you as a homeowner, and we can recommend an architect in most areas, if helpful to you. We are comfortable and experienced working in a wide range of situations.

After gaining an understanding of your goals and priorities, we work with you to simplify the path to achieving an exceptional result. We then produce all the elements of your project in our own workshop, deliver them using our returnable container system, and provide direction and support for installation.

The first step is an initial planning conversation.

16 Sep 2016
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Vibrant Playful Home Creative Family Indianapolis

Very nice article from Design Sponge about Broad Ripple Bungalow – A Vibrant, Playful Home for a Creative Family in Indianapolis.

 

Article by Kate Oliver

When San Francisco transplants Alan and Deborah Leerkamp decided to lay down roots in the Midwest with young daughter Samuelle, they knew they’d be hard-pressed to find an open-concept home in a neighborhood where the vast majority of homes built in the 20s and 30s have remained untouched. Instead, they focused their efforts on finding a house in the best location: a place close to school and work with a strong sense of community, where they could walk or bike just about anywhere they needed to go.

Just a few miles north of a vibrant, rapidly shifting downtown Indianapolis, IN lies Broad Ripple Village, a walkable community long known for its tree-lined streets and traditional homes with coffee, groceries, breweries, and a great spot to brunch right around the corner. After finding a 1920s Craftsman in the heart of the neighborhood, Deborah, an art director and designer, began planning and sketching an entirely new layout that worked for their family and lifestyle — although you’d never guess such a colorful, open space was behind the front door of the quaint bungalow.

With the help of a local architect, Deborah’s vision for a welcoming, modern home came to life. By opening up the attic, exposing beams, and tearing out walls, she created a unified space that invited conversation and quality time for the close-knit family of three; a lively home where Samuelle would love growing up. The couple added unexpected, playful elements they dreamed of having in their own childhoods: a secret treehouse loft accessed by a rope ladder and a big yellow tube slide from the main level to the basement playroom for Samuelle and her friends (and sometimes adults, too!). The main living quarters consist of the open-concept great room, two bedrooms, bathrooms, and an office that feels proportionate to their family on a daily basis, but their nest can expand when the family needs a little extra space. A creative room with soaring ceilings connects the main house to a private guest loft for visiting family and friends.

The Leerkamps have created a home that is honest, approachable, and so uniquely them — a home that not only serves their needs, but one that brings them true joy. Their home is a reflection of who they are: welcoming, genuine, and warm people who seek a life well-lived. It serves as a reminder to break the rules sometimes, to create homes that truly represent who we are and make us smile when we open the door after a long day. —Kate

Design Sponge - Vibrant Playful Home Creative Family Indianapolis - Kate Oliver
Design Sponge – Vibrant Playful Home Creative Family Indianapolis – Kate Oliver
13 Aug 2016
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Midcentury Gut Job Underway

Check out progress on this Midcentury Gut Job at 81st/Springmill area.  We are really excited about this one – it is pretty much a total redo both inside and out!  Check out the latest updates on the project page.

23 Jul 2016
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New Modern Entry Bridge Progress

New Modern Entry Bridge is progressing at Copperwood right on schedule.  Bridge spans the front clerestory bay lower level walkout which provides an abundance of natural light to the lower level.  Check out the project page for the latest comprehensive updates.  We are really looking forward to finishing the final details around mid-September 2016 on this New Modern Home in Zionsville.

07 Jul 2016
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Infinity Pool

Infinity Pool has been poured in the rear private courtyard at our New Modern House Ditch Road project.  This unique project is progressing inside and out.  We are looking forward to project completion in late 2016.  Please check out the project page for the most current updates!

06 Jul 2016
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Job Shadow – Alex Freriks

We enjoyed having Alex Freriks for several days this summer as a job shadow as part of a senior project.  He was able to participate in a few client meetings, learn a little bit about the design process, and learn about Golden Section (actually, Alex, did you Google Golden Section like we encouraged you to do? – that was your only homework – we will have to follow-up on that).

Alex is a senior at Greenwood Community High School in Greenwood, IN.  He has been a part of the Greenwood Marching Woodmen for 2 years since moving to Greenwood his sophomore year.  Before then, he attended Lassiter High School in Marietta, GA and was a part of the Lassiter High School Marching Band.  For the 2016 marching season, he will be one of the three Drum Majors for the band.

He enjoys listening to and playing music as well as enjoys sports such as baseball and football.  He plays ten instruments and is proficient in 4 of them: Bass Clarinet, Trombone, Tuba, and Baritone.  One of his hobbies is collecting playing cards.  Academically, he lives for science, especially physics as well as mathematics. He is looking to attend Purdue University or the University of Illinois after graduating High School to major in Mechanical Engineering.  Since we are architects, we encouraged Alex to go above and beyond the job shadow at HAUS by contacting some mechanical engineering firms for a job shadow.  

Good luck, Alex!

02 Jul 2016
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Scandinavian Rec Room

Scandinavian Rec Room from our Classic Butler-Tarkington Modern Tudor featured here – check it out!

“Rec Rooms can be multipurpose areas that are fit for both unwinding and working.  Versatile and low-key, Scandinavian designs can help you create a fun, bright and open space for all sorts of activities, from a game of foosball to catching-up on studying … a space your family will love!

18 Jun 2016
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See How Salvaged Wood Doors Add Character to a Home

Check-out this article about Salvaged Wood Doors featuring HAUS’ Broad Ripple Bungalow.

Designers use distinctive old doors to make a statement in these spaces – Salvaged Wood Doors.

by 

Article Link Here

A door is just an entry to another space, right? Not in these projects, where the passage into another room is an experience in itself.
These homes have converted regular doors into art pieces. Take a peek inside to see how you might use a flea market find, a family heirloom or a souvenir from foreign lands.

Old Wood, New Look

If you can’t find an antique door you like, you can always recycle wood to replicate the same aesthetic.

A carpenter was going to fabricate the doors for this bathroom, but the client found a vendor who reworks reclaimed barn wood into doors for about $250 to $300 per door.  It gives a nice texture and warmth to the modern bathroom, says Christopher Short, principal architect at HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles.  They were installed with inexpensive barn door hardware.

If there is old paint on the doors, people may want to consider sealing them with a satin finish to maintain their rustic quality, Short says.

“Using old doors is a great way to recycle while maintaining character of an original historic space, even if they were not originally part of that same structure,” he says.

04 Jun 2016
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New Modern House 3 CMU Walls Completion!

New Modern House 3 CMU Walls Completion – HAUS’ new modern house 3 steadily progresses in Indiana Head Park Chicago.  Having weathered a brutal winter, things are picking-up speed now.  We are looking forward to getting weathered-in and ready to re-engage/refine the interior details/finishes.  Check out the project link here.  Please check back for updates.

01 Jun 2016
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Midcentury Modern Renovation Begins

Midcentury Modern Renovation Begins in Meridian Hills Neighborhood, Indianapolis.  This 1960 original Midcentury Modern home, purchased by our clients in late summer 2015, will be a whole-home remodel, including an overhaul of just about everything inside and outside.  Please check-out the project page here, as we will be posting key updates along the way!

17 May 2016
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20 Awesome Examples Of Wood Ceilings

HAUS project featured in Contemporist article about wood ceilings – check out these amazing projects from around the world!

Wood is a great way to add warmth to an interior, but it doesn’t just have to be about floors and furniture. Here are 20 examples of interiors that put wood on the ceiling.  Check-out number 7.

 

01 May 2016
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Featured in May 2016 Indy Monthly

HAUS’ Broad Ripple Bungalow is featured in May 2016 Indy Monthly Magazine.  Check out the spread here and scroll down.  Check-out the online magazine link here.

Tinker Time

San Francisco transplants turn the interior of a 1920s bungalow into their own Broad Ripple playground.

By Taylor Ellis

Photography by Tony Valainis

When Deborah Jacobs and Alan Leerkamp moved to Indy from California, they captured Broad Ripple’s playful, artsy spirit in their bungalow just south of the main strip like they’d been living in the area for years.  That’s what happens – even if unintentionally – when great creative minds collaborate:  Deborah, an art director and designer who has refurbished the homes of Google employees, partnered with HAUS, a local architecture studio with a contemporary edge, on a six-month renovation project.  “They really get it,” says Chris Short, principal architect at HAUS.  “Most people don’t have those kinds of [creative] interests and skills.  We were speaking the same language.”

23 Apr 2016
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Architect’s Licensing Ceremony

“Humbly and proudly I profess my competence under the discipline of architecture.

Upon my honor I promise unending devotion to the task of continually studying, learning, seeking, experimenting, that I may become ever better educated and trained for my work.

Upon my honor I promise to my community undeviating adherence to the ideal service to my fellow men, as the goal of my effort, that I may honestly and fully earn my living – my right to live among them.

Upon my honor I promise to maintain that integrity in practice which will insure to each client the finest possible stewardship of his interest.

Upon my honor I promise in the execution of every commission to strive to create beauty as well as order, character as well as safety, spiritual value as well as convenience.

Upon my honor I promise to join with my fellow architects to make our profession of greatest possible usefulness and benefit to our society, to share and disseminate all valuable professional knowledge, and to pass on to the succeeding generation the full and fine discipline of our profession, enriched because of my dedication.”

– State of Indiana Architect’s Oath

 

2016 State of Indiana Architect's Licensing Ceremony
2016 State of Indiana Architect’s Licensing Ceremony

On April 23, 2016, our team member Paul was recognized in a formal architect’s licensing ceremony by the State of Indiana and the Indiana chapter of the American Institute of Architects. The Architect’s Licensing Ceremony used to be a sort of right of passage until roughly a decade ago when the State ceased holding the ceremony. Historically, those honored in the ceremony were individuals who had become licensed in the previous year. In 2016, in conjunction with AIA Indiana, the State decided to resume the architect’s licensing ceremony!

As part of the ceremony, they newest licensees were given words of wisdom by a fellow architect as she told stories of blazing a trail as a young architect. Following the words of wisdom, each licensee was individually recognized and presented with a signed and sealed license certificate. To conclude the ceremony the licensees recited the architect’s oath (above) as the many had done previously.

2016 State of Indiana Architect's Licensing Ceremony
2016 State of Indiana Architect’s Licensing Ceremony

We would like to extend our warmest congratulations to all of those architects licensed in the past year. Having gone through the journey, we know the arduous adventure becomes more of an exciting exploration. We wish you all the best in your careers ahead.

02 Apr 2016
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Housequake

Housequake – A new spring 2016 photo of home + studio – check out the project story here.

 

24 Mar 2016
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Rediscovering Campus Style Homes

WSJ Article examines how some luxury homeowners are rediscovering so-called campus style homes, using separate wings or buildings for living, recreation, cooking, and sleeping.

Check-out these HAUS compound style homes – New Modern House Ditch, French Country Estate, New Modern Farmhouse 2, New Modern House 2.

Rediscovering the Campus-Style Family Home

Some luxury homeowners are embracing so-called compound properties, using separate wings or buildings for sleeping, cooking and lounging

By CECILIE ROHWEDDER
March 24, 2016 9:58 a.m. ET
To go from the living room to the master suite of their home on Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay, Hans and Julia Krebs walk to a different building.

Their bedroom is separated from the main house by a book-lined indoor walkway. Another walkway leads to a third building, which houses the kitchen and dining area, as well as a suite for Ms. Krebs’s mother, a frequent visitor. The garage is in a fourth building. What ties it all together: white, modern facades and black, gabled roofs.

“Our goal was to maximize privacy and view,” says Mr. Krebs, a 69-year-old retired gynecologic oncologist. With his wife, a 65-year-old health care lawyer, Mr. Krebs spent $1.5 million to build the four-bedroom, 5,000-square-foot home, which also includes a boathouse and a farm-equipment building.
Architects call them campus or compound-style homes. Like small university campuses, they are made up of separate wings or buildings that have distinct functions, such as sleeping, cooking or lounging. Separating different parts of living, fans say, allows not just for privacy, but also for a different look and feel in each area. Proponents also argue that campuses blend into the landscape and allow for life with few or no stairs, a popular feature with aging Americans.

Campus-style living has its roots in American history. Maryland, where Annapolis-based architect Marta Hansen built the Krebs’s home in 2006, is rife with five-part Colonial compounds that consist of a main house attached to smaller wings on both sides. The classic American homestead is a cluster of buildings that include the kitchen and smokehouse, set apart to reduce fire risk. In traditional Spanish and Mexican architecture, connected buildings are arranged around a patio.

Creating a village for one owner has its downsides. A house deconstructed into different parts can be more expensive than a single-unit home—between 25% and 30% more, estimates San Francisco-based architect Malcolm Davis, who frequently designs multipart homes. More buildings require more perimeter foundation, he explains, adding to construction costs. More exterior walls need more windows and cause more potential heat loss, adding to maintenance costs.

Multibuilding living can also create its own set of practical considerations—one may have to traipse a longer distance to find the children, or retrieve the Amazon package from the front door.

Fans dismiss such criticisms. Kristin and Scott Fine, a general partner at a hedge fund, recently completed renovating their 101-year-old waterfront home in Darien, Conn. As part of the two-year, $2.5 million project, a glass-and-steel structure was created to attach a kitchen wing to one side of the house, and a separate, open-air steel arbor was erected to create an outdoor living room, framing the view of Long Island Sound.

The arbor connects the home to a new yoga and pool house, whose detachment from the main house—busy with four children and two dogs—makes the space more effective, according to the Fines. “A yoga room being physically separate is key to quieting my mind,” says Ms. Fine, a 43-year-old interior designer who has her own company, Fine Concepts, and worked on the project with New York City-based architect Michael Haverland. She says she usually runs to the building barefoot—”maybe” throwing on boots if there is snow.

The Fines’ compound isn’t done: The two buildings are first steps in a master plan for the 6-acre property that now has 13,400 square feet of living space. The couple is expecting to add a sports building with an indoor lap pool, spa and batting cage, as well as a building with private gallery space that can also house three artists as part of a planned residency program.

In 2014, Jonathan King and Jim Stott bought one of the oldest houses in Maine, 354-year-old Bray House in Kittery Point. The founders of Stonewall Kitchen, a York, Maine-based maker of jams, sauces and other specialty foods, Messrs. King and Stott had previously lived in historic homes and knew the shortcomings, such as low ceilings and wind blowing through old walls in the winter. But they were drawn to Bray House’s rich past and waterfront setting, to Mr. King “the most beautiful view in the world.”

The pair turned to Jacobsen Architecture, a Washington, D.C., firm with expertise in fusing contemporary space and historic buildings, including at the U.S. Capitol.

 

Now, 1,450-square-foot Bray House is undergoing a $1 million renovation. It will be linked on both sides to indoor glass walkways leading to no fewer than 12 gabled pavilions that house a large living and dining space, a master-bedroom suite and an office. As part of the $5 million project, which Messrs King and Stott hope to complete by Labor Day 2017, even the laundry room will have its own building.

“We want friends to come in, enjoy cocktails by the fire at Bray House, but then go into a 21st century space,” says Mr. King, who is 50 and chief creative officer of Stonewall Kitchen. Spreading out the additions horizontally, he says, means adding space—8,125 square feet of it—without adding height. “It’s not going to feel like we’re building this massive thing to block the view of the ocean.”

Owner Diane Goldsmith from Orinda, Calif., bought the 2,700-square-foot, three-bedroom house with her husband, David, for $1.6 million in 2012. “I liked the idea of a sense of privacy and change as you walk from one part of the house into another,” says Ms. Goldsmith, a 65-year-old graphic designer. “Family and interactions on one side; rest and contemplation of the beauty of Sea Ranch on the other,” adds Mr. Goldsmith, a 68-year-old retired investment banker.

Spreading out a house can create inconvenience. Answering the door is a trek. So is hauling around laundry or fixing a cup of tea. Owners say technology helps keep it together: Baby monitors can track children in far-off nurseries, and many keep kettles and refrigerators in the master suite to avoid nighttime trips to the kitchen.

Peter and Maria Grazia Selzer’s $2 million, 3,600-square-foot home built by San Francisco-based architect Nick Noyes in Taos, N.M., consists of a rammed-earth Territorial-style house and two flat-roof Pueblo-style buildings on both sides. As such, the distance from the master bedroom to the kitchen is between 60 and 70 feet.

Mr. Selzer, a 70-year-old radiologist, says the isolation of the bedroom, located at the end of its own wing, is an advantage. “You could have a brass band going on in the main part of the house and we wouldn’t hear it,” he says.

Write to Cecilie Rohwedder at cecilie.rohwedder@wsj.com

07 Mar 2016
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Creative Shared Bedroom Ideas for a Modern Kids’ Room

Creative Shared Bedroom Ideas Kids Modern Bedroom

Check out this article at Freshome.com which features HAUS custom shared kids’ room – project photo #15.

By Neila Deen 

Laughing…crying…playing…fighting. A shared sibling bedroom is a beehive of activity and needs. And that means there’s a lot for parents to tackle when creating their kids’ shared bedroom. With twice the amount (or more) of evolving personalities and necessities, it’s often a daunting task for parents to accommodate storage, space and the individual style of each child.

Here are some helpful tips to overcome common design challenges and create a happy and functional room for your young roommates.

Creating a Boy and Girl Shared Room

Designing a room for a brother and a sister doesn’t have to be challenging. In fact, it’s probably the easiest challenge to overcome when planning a shared room.

Your first step is to select an underlying color palette for the main elements of the room (walls, rug, furniture) that is gender neutral…and, if they’re old enough to chime in, that each sibling gives the thumbs up. Color combos such as white and grey, turquoise and white or a mix of primary colors work well for both boys and girls.

To complement your underlying palette, layer complementary colors and patterns on top of that. For example in a grey and white room, try accenting with yellow accessories. For patterns, lean towards stripes, chevron or solids with large geometric shape(s).

When selecting furniture, opt for furniture with clean lines and that’s non-themed (steer clear of the race car or sleeping beauty beds) and pair with neutral colored essentials such as lamps and window treatments.

The exciting part of creating a super fun bedroom for your young brood is accessorizing and customizing design elements to match their budding personalities. Select design elements that make the room feel like it belongs to both of them. Personalize accessories throughout the room such as wall art or coat hooks. Marquee lights with their names or first initial add a pop of energy and excitement to any space. Likewise, subtly add gender specific themes in one or two accessories, but keep them color coordinated. For example when accessorizing with red, try a throw pillow with a red fire engine for him, and a pillow with a red flower or heart for her. Storage that is complementary to the design scheme but specific for each gender (think charcoal for boys and yellow for girls) can also seamlessly pull a room together.

Creating a Room For Different Ages

Sometimes its not just Jeremy and Sarah that you need to accommodate, but a 3-year-old Jeremy and a 4-month-old Sarah can definitely add another layer of design anxiety.

The first thing to tackle is the furniture layout. If you have a baby, chances are you’ll be in and out of the room at night to tend to the baby. If possible, place their beds in opposite corners or walls with the crib being most accessible to the door. Obviously structural elements such as windows and heaters can dictate otherwise but your design objective is to give each child the most comfortable night’s sleep without one waking the other.

Creating a play area that both siblings can enjoy, even simultaneously, is super helpful, especially for tired mommies and daddies. Floor mats, cushions and soft larger items like a rocking horse and tents are perfect to outline the area and fun for both to play in. Place your older child’s toys in accessible storage containers, but higher than the floor so your youngest can’t easily touch it.

For example, whether it’s a bookshelf, storage cube or wall unit, place baby friendly toys and items on the lower shelves. Your toddler or older child can stand and reach for the basket of Lego.

Incorporate elements that show your children their growing family. Photos of the kids together, framed handprints of when they each were newborns encourage them to appreciate their younger or older sibling while adding a warm family atmosphere to their bedroom.

Creating Ample Storage for Two or More

Finding the space in one room for twice as much furniture and storage is one of the most daunting tasks when designing a shared room. This is where your resourcefulness and editing eye need to kick into high gear. Less is definitely more in a shared bedroom, as is multifunctional and shared design.

As a baseline, selecting streamlined furniture is essential to keep the room feeling as spacious as possible and allow for storage and playing. If your kids are old enough, bunk beds are always an excellent choice. Whether L-shaped or vertical, a bunk bed is an efficient use of space and oftentimes has built-in storage underneath.

Speaking of…under the bed storage such as rollaway drawers is always helpful in creating more space and can hold seasonal or limited use items. Storage chests with cushions can be used as a seat to a play table as well as conceal a mountain of toys. A wall unit with drawers can pull double duty as a dresser and desk.

Shelving is super convenient for toy organization as it doesn’t take up a lot of space and can be placed above dressers, desks, even above the door for hardly used items. Similarly, placing a bookshelf at the foot of the bed doesn’t take up valuable wall space and may even give you another surface near the bed for a lamp or nighttime book.

For clothing, wall and door hooks are helpful for every-day go-to items. In the closet, install two rods (i.e. double hanging) so each child can have separate hanging space.

Regardless of your design challenge, when creating a shared room for your little ones if you stick to resourceful, efficient, fun and creative choices, you’ll no doubt create a bedroom your kids will love!

How are you going to design your kids’ bedroom?

Creative Shared Bedroom Ideas Kids

01 Mar 2016
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Top Tips for Furnishing Large Rooms

Butler-Tarkington Modern Tudor interior featured in article, “Top Tips for Furnishing Large Rooms”- check it out!

Open spaces lend themselves to floating furniture and ceiling definition to visually demarcate space – check out these amazing interiors from around the world.

24 Feb 2016
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POP ART Apartment Therapy

HAUS’ Broad Ripple Bungalow POP ART Apartment Therapy featured in article.  Check out the link!

10 Innovative Ways to Decorate w Ladders + POP ART
POP ART Apartment Therapy
31 Jan 2016
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Craftsman Expansion Underway

Craftsman Expansion Underway #downbytheriver.

One-time exemption allows this major Craftsman addition in flood-plain designated area abutting the White River just west of Keystone near 75th Street.  Amenities include new entry, kitchen, mudroom, home office, powder room, screened porch, wrap-around deck/grille area, covered balcony, new master suite, expanded childrens’ bedrooms, and revamped third floor/attic/recreation story.

This will be the place to be for 2016 summer river parties!

Construction Progress Photo of Craftsman Expansion (December 2015)

New Craftsman Expansion Underway
New Craftsman Expansion Underway

Learn more about Craftsman Style Architecture

#Craftsman #Style #Architecture #Floodplain

25 Jan 2016
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Home Spa Experience Essentials

HAUS Home Spa Featured in Article, “10 Essentials for Enjoying a Spa-Like Experience at Home“.  This bathroom remodel was part of a comprehensive residential addition.  Unique characteristics of this spa include the adaptive-use of the original 1930’s glass tile and cast iron tub into a more efficient, modern design.  Vanity is a custom-made open-legged table for a furniture look and more open feel in a relatively small main floor bath.  Original double-hung window was replaced with obscure glass block.

14 Jan 2016
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11 Dreamy Master Suites

Article:  11 Dreamy Master Suites – Shabby Chic Master Bedroom Suite in HAUS’ Broad Ripple Bungalow featured in article, “11 Parental Suites of our Dreams” (interpretation).  Suites of differing styles from around the world are highlighted – check out the article here.

Interpreted Text Below:

11 Parental Suites of our Dreams

And if parents finally had the right to their own space for cocooning?

The Romantic Suite:

The decorative element of strength in this Shabby Chic bedroom suite is of course the raw barn door.  Sanded and whitened to match the minimalist and romantic style of the room, she separates the sleeping quarters from the spa.  The white walls and big mirrors placed behind the bed bring in a light that almost seems poetic.  We will particularly salute the ingenious sliding door system that allows for a flexible gain of space.