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28 Mar 2016
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Midcentury Modern Renovation 2

We are happy to report that Midcentury Modern Renovation, buried in the woods adjacent to Williams Creek and Meridian Hills,  is now complete!  As a result, we would like to thank an excellent team that that helped make the vision a successful reality.  Above all, thanks to our MCM-fanatic clients for another chance to work together, this time to help create the dream-home they have sought-out for years.

Media Links:

Dezeen Magazine: Haus overhauls midcentury modern home in the Indiana woods

Mod-Abode.com: Mid-Mod Makover

Dezeen Magazine – Five of the best houses in Indiana on Dezeen

Curbed Article: 1950s Home Gets Contemporary Overhaul in Indiana

Great Lakes By Design:  Recaptured Modern (see print edition)

Great Lakes By DESIGN - Volume 2 Issue 4 - Cover - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture
Great Lakes By Design (Cover) – Volume 2 Issue 4

Living Magazine:  A House in the Woods

Living Magazine Cover - 2018-October - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture
Living Magazine (Cover) – 2018-Oct

 


Project Info – Midcentury Modern Renovation

Architecture:  HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles (Chris Short + Derek Mills)
Interior Architecture:  HAUS with Design Studio Vriesman (Tom Vriesman)
Construction:  Wrightworks (Christopher Wright)
Landscape Architecture: A2 Design (Eric Anderson)
Photography: HAUS


Process – Design Process

Before Photos

We will be uploading more “before” photos in the near future, so please check-back for updates.

The questions with many residential renovation projects is, “how far do we want to take this?”  “Will it be like a new home?”  “Is it easier and less expensive to just build new?”  “Or is it better to rebuild to our specifications in this desirable location?”.  We discussed all of these questions and more during the design stage.  Ultimately, our client had committed to purchasing the property prior to engaging with the design team.  So when we engaged the design phase, we reviewed big-picture design options focused around client’s thoughtful list of prioritized goals.  And by all means, we didn’t hold back too much in the brainstorming phase.  However, we kept the best ideas addressing priorities and budget while down-scaling some of the negotiables.

Before Exterior Photograph - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture
Before Exterior Photograph – Midcentury Modern Renovation – 81st Street, Indianapolis

Here below is the project site plan.  Please check back, as we will plan to share more of the design process, including a few big ideas and concepts.

Site Plan - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture
Site Plan – Midcentury Modern Renovation – 81st Street – Indianapolis
Building Section - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture
Building Section – Midcentury Modern Renovation – 81st Street – Indianapolis

 

Construction Progress – Midcentury Modern Renovation

Demo + New Framing

Construction kicked-off in summer 2016 and subsequently, the project achieved substantial completion by mid-2017.

This Bill Wright original design stood as a time-capsule from the 1960s, until now experiencing only minor alterations from the original build that originated in 1959.  Prior to our involvement, most of the original finishes and materials remained untouched, if showing the wear of the prior five decades.  While existing cork floors, custom wood built-ins, galley kitchen, and floor-to ceiling windows remained in fair condition, original Redwood siding was compromised with insects and woodpeckers.  Furthermore, the surrounding landscape was overgrown and encroaching on the house, and previous owners had sold-off portions of what was originally a larger plot.

Mid-century Modern Renovation 2
View from the Woods – New Screened Porch Slab Installed – Midcentury Modern Renovation, Indianapolis (early summer 2016)

As with many homes from prior decades and even this Midcentury gem, we decided to open the space more to maximize views, light, and family engagement.  To that end, our solution included the incorporation of new steel structure concealed inside the pre-existing roof structure.  Equally important, the LVL supporting the steel beam in the window-wall beyond enables maximum glazing and natural light for the open-concept kitchen.  Without a doubt, opening the kitchen to the main living space will be a major enhancement.

Mid-century Modern Renovation 2
New Steel Beam Installed in Kitchen-Living Area – Midcentury Modern Renovation, Indianapolis (Summer 2016)

Screened Porch Addition

As with many older buildings, the roof and structure needed some attention.  But first, we needed to extend and cantilever the original roof structure to shelter the new screened porch.  To that end, we were able to achieve the extension with 2×10 joists matching original structure, cantilevering them over new steel beams/columns, designed to be exposed.  Exposed steel was a pre-existing motif from the original house at main entrance, so as seen below, we continue that modern motif in the screened porch extension.

Mid-century Modern Renovation 2
Extended Porch Roof Framed + Window Installations – Midcentury Modern Renovation, Indianapolis (Summer 2016)

 

Mid-century Modern Renovation 2
Porch Roof Framed + Window Installations – Midcentury Modern Renovation, Indianapolis (Summer 2016)

 

Mid-century Modern Renovation 2
New Porch Roof Framed + Window Installations – Midcentury Modern Renovation, Indianapolis (Summer 2016)

 

Roof

In this south view of the porch extension below, we can see an increase in the roof-edge thickness.  This additional thickness is for the purpose of supporting a complete re-roof, enabling repairs to deck, allowing for proper roof-slope to drains, and adding a minimum R-24 insulation above the roof deck.  With proper design, roofs don’t require ventilation, which can be more efficient than ventilated roofs.  To that end, we have found that many in the construction industry don’t understand the basic building science behind non-ventilated roofs, particularly as it relates to moisture management.  So if you are investing in residential or commercial renovation or new construction, please be sure you are working with qualified professionals.

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Porch Roof Extension - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Porch Roof Extension – Midcentury Modern Renovation, Indianapolis (Sept 2016)

 

Site

Accordingly, the site or location is often the primary reason to purchase a property.  Undeniably in this case, both site and house were inspirations, as this property affords beauty, privacy, and enough natural light in and around the Midcentury dwelling.

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - view from screened porch
View from screened porch – Midcentury Modern Renovation, Indianapolis (Sept 2016)

Rough-ins

The construction team removed all interior finishes down to slab and studs.  Likewise, they saw-cut and patched concrete slabs for plumbing and modified roof structure to achieve open-concept and achieve more interior natural light.  Also, we infilled the original main entry porch to create the “Everything Room” and a conditioned entry between Garage, Mudroom, and house.  In contrast, the team elected to maintain the existing masonry fireplace and chimney, with only upgrades to the floating cast-in-place hearth slab.

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Kitchen Area Progress
Kitchen Area Progress – Midcentury Modern Renovation (Sept 2016)

 

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - February 2017 Exterior
Exterior Progress – screened porch framing and fascias/soffits nearing completion – Midcentury Modern Renovation, Indianapolis (Feb 2017)

 

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Screened Porch View
Screened Porch View – Cedar framing installations underway – Midcentury Modern Renovation (Feb 2017)

 

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Ceiling Fireplace Collar Detail
Ceiling Fireplace Collar Detail @screened porch – Midcentury Modern Renovation (Feb 2017)

 

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Entry Skylight
Entry Skylight (Feb 2017)

Interior Finishes

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Interior Progress (Living Dining Kitchen)
Interior Progress – Living Dining Kitchen (Feb 2017)

 

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Walnut Veneer Closet Panels - Finishing
Walnut Veneer Closet Panels – Finishing (Feb 2017)

 

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Master Closet Installation
Master Closet Installation (Feb 2017)

 

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Master Vanity Installation
Master Vanity Installation (Feb 2017)

Custom Built-ins

This Midcentury closet detail below is one of many refined retro-modern features at Midcentury Modern Renovation 2.  Hence, the team incorporated book-matched Walnut veneer millwork at Entry, Kitchen, Bedrooms, Vanities, and TV Room to continue this timeless, Midcentury vibe.  Spring has sprung and Owner has moved-into the project even while mostly exterior work continues forward.

Midcentury Closet Detail
Midcentury Closet Detail (Spring 2017)

Hard and soft-scaping continues outside, and we are particularly eager to see installation of final exterior finishes.  As one can see, we have maximized exterior windows to capitalize on the scenic panorama.

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Exterior Progress
Exterior Progress (Spring 2017)

Landscape

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Inside Out Entry Wall
Inside Out Entry Wall (Spring 2017)

Privacy walls are a predominant motif in Midcentury Modern Architecture, and so we utilized a screenwall to achieve multiple project goals in one move.  For instance, the entry wall (see photos above and below) serves multiple purposes:  one, to frame entry court with material continuing outside to inside, and two, to frame a private outside courtyard.  This allows larger bedroom openings to maximize south light while achieving both privacy and security.  One move, multiple benefits.

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Inside Out Entry Wall Become Privacy Fence
Inside-Out Entry Wall Become Privacy Fence (Spring 2017)

 

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Private Moss Garden - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture (A2 Design)
Private Moss Garden (late Summer 2017)

 

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Outside In Entry Wall - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture (A2 Design)
Outside-In Entry Wall (late Summer 2017)

 

Midcentury Modern Renovation 2 - Outside In Entry Wall - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture (A2 Design)
Outside In Entry Wall (late Summer 2017)

Details

Playful child bedroom with colorful cubbies and wall storage, complete with world map and reading books, Natural wide plank white oak flooring, plush area rug, Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture, Jamie Sangar Photography
Playful child bedroom with colorful cubbies, Jamie Sangar Photography (October 2017)

 

Original Mid Mod Fireplace, modern furniture, large red area rugs, custom artwork, retro furnishings, inside out brick wall, exposed brick, leather side chairs, linen sofa, wide plank oak flooring, Walnut kitchen cabinets, Quartz tops grey, ceramic artwork, orange teapot, stainless steel range hood, kitchen skylight, Saarinen bench, Saarinen wine cart, pendant dining lights, custom Walnut live edge dining table, Eames shell chairs, floor to ceiling window wall, wooded site - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture, Jamie Sangar Photography
Dining space looking out to the woods, Jamie Sangar Photography (October 2017)

As shown below, skylights add a nice touch to the middle hallway and other spaces that don’t benefit from exterior windows.  These two skylights openings were original to the house, and in this case, we upgraded to new units.

Daylighting with skylights creates even light in hallway, wide plank white oak flooring, art on clean, white walls with minimal trims, - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture, Jamie Sangar Photography
Daylight pours into the hall, Jamie Sangar Photography (October 2017)

 

Foyer greetings from custom art and furniture, grey slate entry floor tile, colorful, red area rug - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture, Jamie Sangar Photography
Foyer art greets guests, Jamie Sangar Photography (October 2017)

 

Original Mid Mod Fireplace, raised concrete hearth, modern furniture, large red area rugs, custom artwork, retro furnishings, inside out brick wall, exposed brick, leather side chairs, linen sofa, flokate pillow, wide plank oak flooring - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture, Jamie Sangar Photography
Modern furniture with clean lines, Jamie Sangar Photography (October 2017)

 

Original Mid Mod Fireplace, raised concrete hearth, modern furniture, large red area rugs, custom artwork, retro furnishings, inside out brick wall, exposed brick, leather side chairs, linen sofa, flokate pillow, wide plank oak flooring - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture, Jamie Sangar Photography
Furniture details, Jamie Sangar Photography (October 2017)

 

Master Spa Bathroom, Walnut vanity, quartz top, subway tile shower, teak shower floor, custom tile niche, full height Walnut master closet doors, bathroom skylight, slate tile flooring, hidden pocket door, clear glass shower enclosure - Midcentury Modern Renovation - 81st Street - Indianapolis, Christopher Short, Architect, HAUS Architecture, Jamie Sangar Photography
Custom niche foot rest, Jamie Sangar Photography (October 2017)

Haus midcentury modern  renovation in the Indiana woods

by Jenna McKnight (Dezeen) 6 February 2018

New exterior cladding, a moss garden and a multipurpose room are among the updates to a 1950s residence in the American Midwest revamped by design studio Haus.

The project, called Midcentury Modern Renovation, is situated on a wooded property in Indianapolis encompassing just under an acre.  The surrounding area is known for the presence of several exemplary Midcentury modern dwellings built in the 1950s and 1960s.  The clients purchased the midcentury modern home – built in 1956 and designed by Bill Wright of the Indiana firm Vonnegut, Wright, and Porteous – in 2015, after leaving a note for the owner expressing an interest in buying the property if it became available.  “A few years later, the call and opportunity finally arose,” said Haus, a local architecture studio.

The three-bedroom home had remained unchanged over the decades with the exception of minor renovations in 1967 by the original owner, who lived there until 2013.   The client charged the architects with enlarging and renovating the low-slung dwelling shaded by mature trees.  “Having worked with this client on their previous mid-mod renovation project in 2011, we were excited about the prospect of working with them again on something more comprehensive,” said Haus.

The clients presented the team with a list of goals and priorities.  The initial planning process included Haus, an interior designer and the owners, who together conceived various options for the 2,260-square-foot (210-square-metre) dwelling, which was in dire need of repairs.

Exterior

Woodpeckers and insects had damaged the original redwood siding, and the home’s flat roof required significant upgrades.  The interior also called for an overhaul.  “This house needed everything,” said the architects.  “The wooded site and location in the city was excellent, but the house was 60 years old with mostly original finishes and fixtures, including original cork floors, and excellent examples of custom wood built-ins that didn’t fit the new vision for refurbishment.”

Sitting atop a concrete foundation, the wood-framed home was re-clad in vertical-groove, poly-ash siding with a smooth finish.  Strips of cedar with an ebony stain were used for the entrance area and a dog run.  The team installed a new membrane roof that channels stormwater to “rain chains” on the side of the home.  Owner and Architect retained and refurbished existing roof overhangs.  Haus revamped the main entrance, adding an “inside-out entry wall” that frames the entry sequence and a garden.  The same-style wall fronts the bedroom wing, helping provide privacy and security while still allowing natural light to pass through large windows.

Interior

Inside, the team made a series of modifications.  The entrance features slate tile flooring and a wooden wall that mimics the exterior cladding.  The client specifically requested a new flexible area – dubbed the “everything room” – which the team added just off the foyer and serves as a mudroom, dog area, laundry room and a crafting workspace.  In total, the team added 340 square feet (32 square metres) of space to the residence.

The open-plan living room features an original brick fireplace with a cantilevered concrete hearth.  The team fitted the room with wood flooring, white walls and an eclectic mix of decor.  Similarly, the kitchen and bedrooms feature a range of motifs and materials.  “A mix of period and more modern furnishings pair nicely with the interior finishes, lighting and fixtures to achieve a re-imagined interior respectful of the home’s roots and reflective of the owners’ aesthetic and lifestyle,” the team said.

Throughout the residence, floor-to-ceiling glass provides unobstructed views of the verdant lawn and surrounding woods.  A screened porch with a black stove serves as a sheltered area for relaxing and feeling connected to the outdoors.  The team also modified the landscape around the dwelling.  Owner strategically cleared trees and underbrush to allow more natural light into the home, and modern hardscaping and vegetation, including a moss garden, help “articulate the indoor-outdoor connections”.

 

19 Feb 2017
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Modern Lakehouse

Modern Lakehouse revitalization at Lake Clearwater in Indianapolis is now complete!  This neighborhood, originally established in 1980s, has been undergoing a wave of substantial property improvements for the last several years.  Certainly, it benefits from lakefront property in an area with some of the best restaurants and shopping in Indiana.

This project marks our third project in the neighborhood and second Clearwater design-build effort in 4 years.  We really appreciate having another opportunity to work with this particular client, who is one of our all-time faves.  Sometimes a team dynamic is spot-on, and it’s easy to get excited about going above-and-beyond for people that share our enthusiasm for a creative design process.  Fittingly, our client started the process by affectionately naming the project, “Esther”.

 


Project Info – Modern Lakehouse Clearwater:

Architecture/Interior Design/Renderings/Photography:  HAUS | Architecture + Client
Construction Management:  WERK | Building Modern
Featured:  2018 AIA Home Tour
Featured: 2019 Indianapolis Monthly – Home of the Month (April print edition + link)


Media Links:

AIA selected Esther to be on the AIA Home Tour in September 2018, and we enjoyed seeing so many of our friends, colleagues, and clients on the tour!  Here below are some media links featuring Esther.

INDIANAPOLIS MONTHLY Magazine “Healing Waters”

HAVEN Magazine:  A Modern Revival – HAUS and Franklin Window & Door collaborate on Lakehouse

 

 

Design Process – Modern Lakehouse

Background

Previous owners had renovated the property several years ago, but it was time again for something fitting for “Esther”.  So as one would expect, “Esther” wanted to include favorite features from Adagio that we helped design in 2010-2012.  The question was how far would we be able to take the design with required approvals from the HOA.

Design Concept

The design concept simplifies and highlights the existing structure with elementary expressions at entry, main living spaces, and lakeside maximizing south light and panoramic lakeside views.  Also, we eliminated some of the original design complexities for a streamlined solution capitalizing on the simple open-concept gable form and structure.  Entry, Kitchen, Home Office, Dining Area, and Master Suite are all completely remodeled.

Highlights include a white oak ceiling, porcelain tile floor, custom cabinetry, refined trim carpentry, zinc standing seam roof, all new windows, and new exterior cladding.  Our initial goal was to go darker on the exterior colors, but HOA-approved exterior color palette leans lighter.  We may re-open the exterior color discussion again a bit later (see if we can go dark grey).  Update:  Architect originally felt that a darker exterior paint scheme was the way-to-go, but Owner encouraged a lighter color for a better neighborhood fit.  It looks great with the lighter color (Judy, you were right again).

Passive Solar

In the rendering below, you can see a hint of the large south-facing window wall popping-up above the roofline.  We simply wanted to grab some natural light into the main living space.  This move became one of the main features inside and out.

Modern Lakehouse - Clearwater - Aerial View - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Modern Lakehouse – Clearwater – Aerial View

Context

This project was a fun opportunity to fit-in but add a level of refinement to this 1980s development.  The HOA is made-up of open-minded individuals who were okay stepping-out of the box a little-bit.  Some previous projects had integrated standing-seam roofs in accent-entry areas only.  They entertained the idea of a zinc-clad standing-seam roof for this project pending samples and exterior paint finish review.

We proposed horizontal lap siding in keeping with the norm.  However, instead of rough cedar lap, a smooth flush shiplap with reveal joints achieved the look.

Modern Lakehouse - Clearwater - Front Elevation - HAUS Architecture
Modern Lakehouse – Clearwater – Front Elevation

Entry

The entry concept below cleans-up the original inarticulate, busy, nondescript entry with the most simple extension of the existing roof structure.  New front doors/windows face the street and include clear glazing to see directly-in, with foyer gallery wall providing visual privacy into the actual living spaces.  The new garden privacy gate continues material and detail complimenting the new glass and aluminum overhead door.

Modern Lakehouse - Clearwater - Front Door, Derek Mills, HAUS Architecture
Front Entry Concept (Rendering) – Modern Lakehouse – Clearwater

Interior

As with exterior, interior is a simple expression of pre-existing roof structure, and highlights views with completely new glazing.  In the interests of budget and preserving the view, we were able to maintain but reclad the original fireplace.  Also, we have an integrated lighting system highlighting the architectural features to achieve an overall controlled, layered ambiance.

Modern Lakehouse - Clearwater - Interior Living (looking west) - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Interior Living from Entry (Rendering) – Modern Lakehouse – Clearwater

 

Details

This image below is one of our favorite vantage-points in the space, as it highlights the south-facing window-wall anchoring kitchen.  We finished-off the concept by finishing window, back counter/cabinet, and appliances in black.  Then the 13-foot long island floats forward in a lighter tone, integrating with wood ceiling, adjacent white cabinets, and flooring.  The slatwall to the upper left (photo below) is a creative way to hide the return-air grill for the HVAC.

Later during the construction process, we refined the stair guardrails to follow the same slatwall detail for continuity and simplification.  At this time, we were considering linear pin-lights hanging over the kitchen island.  Instead, we shifted to simple 2″ can-lights over the island, and added a glass chandelier at dining table.  It had to be either-or, because pendant lights in each location could have gotten cluttered visually.  Good call by Judy once again.

Modern Lakehouse - Clearwater - Interior Living (looking south) - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Interior Living Space viewed from Master Suite Entry (Rendering) – Modern Lakehouse – Clearwater

Our client has great taste, so we get to benefit from her overall orchestration of interior fixtures and furnishings.  The large custom art-piece indicated on the wall to the far left was taken from previous residence (photo below).  As you can see, we have thought-through most of the interior design elements before construction has begun.  More decisions up-front usually reduce stress-level and improve overall chances at project success.

Modern Lakehouse - Clearwater - Interior Living/Kitchen - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Interior Living/Kitchen (Rendering) – Modern Lakehouse – Clearwater

Budget Planning

From the lakeside, we looked at what impactful changes we could make within budget.  The scope of this project focused primarily on the main level, with only minor cosmetic touches on the lower level.  You can see below how the new glazing and lighted space presents from the lake.  Bedroom to the left originally included glass transom and vaulted ceilings, but these enhancements were simplified during budgeting process.

Design concepts can work at various budgets, and your Architect is the go-to resource to advise on value-engineering decisions.  In the case of this project, the Architect was also the Construction Manager (via WERK | Building Modern), which streamlines the process even more.

Modern Lakehouse - Clearwater - Lakeside Dawn - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture

Lakeside View from Dock (Rendering) – Modern Lakehouse – Clearwater

Construction Process – Modern Lakehouse

“Before” Conditions

Please check-back, as we will add some before shots showing where we began with this property.

Demolition and Structural

We love breaking it open and getting to work.  This photo below shows the framing stage after framers cleaned-out the space and blocked-in openings for winter until receiving windows.  On the west-wall to the right, we added steel structure where needed to support the wind-loads and wall spans.  Furthermore, we modified existing trusses with structural engineer design-assistance.

It’s really important to get a structural engineer involved when opening-up walls and ceilings.  The reason is, some of these elements could be important for the stability of the structure.  To the far left we can begin to see how the new south-facing dormer scales in the space.

Modern Lakehouse - Rough Carpentry
Modern Lakehouse – Rough Carpentry

Here below is a good shot of the new window wall/dormer (looking SSE toward direction of main entry).  Entry is through the framed kitchen wall, with this wall providing privacy from new front entry to main living space.

Modern Lakehouse - Rough Carpentry
Rough Carpentry

The construction of the project started in late fall-early winter 2016.  It looks like it was snowing this day (view from dock below).

Modern Lakehouse - Winter Dock View
Winter Dock View

Window Installation

Windows arrived and we got to live the open views to lake and let sunlight help warm the space.  From a scale standpoint, the interior feels as expected, but always end-up looking better in real life.

Modern Lakehouse Clearwater - New Window Installations
New Window Installations

We love this window wall and think it’s going to be money.

Modern Lakehouse Clearwater - Kitchen Window Detail
Kitchen Window Detail

Here’s a lakeside view when window installations were underway.  We worked with Franklin Window & Door on the acquisition and installation of Marvin Ultimate Series windows for this project.  Having worked on a few properties, we know how lakeside winds and moisture can affect windows, doors, and siding.  This is why we pay strict attention to the design and installation of these walls especially.  An excellent glazing product that manages water is important, as is the proper installation of flashings and sill pans.  For this project, we also integrated a drainage plane (rainscreen) behind the siding that weeps water out of wall cavity.

Modern Lakehouse - Window Installation
Window Installation

We designed and installed all new windows on lakeside while maintaining stone chimney, rooflines, and deck structure.  Furthermore, we were able to achieve some minor enhancements to the decks, but had to maintain the existing 45-degree angles to maintain views from adjacent properties.  Happily, we were able to install prefabricated cable-rail systems to replace the outdated wood guards.

Modern Lakehouse - Window Installation
Window Installation

Custom Mill

Derek Mills, (HAUS + WERK) worked as the project architect and also the construction manager for this project beginning-to-end.  Here in the photo below, Derek is meeting with lumber supplier to discuss options for wood ceiling material.  This lumber supplier also was helpful in brainstorming our options for the shiplap siding and then milling to our specifications.  Yes, Derek Mills was overseeing the milling process.  However, Derek was not doing any actual milling.

Modern Lakehouse - White Oak Ceiling Samples, Derek Mills, WERK Building Modern, HAUS Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Modern Lakehouse – White Oak Ceiling Samples, Derek Mills

White oak is a great, timeless, beautiful material.  Here below, the ceiling material is stacked on-site after milling and delivery.  We were also able to utilize extra materials for the mirror accent wall in the Powder Room (see finish photos).

Modern Lakehouse Lake Clearwater Indianapolis - White Oak Ceiling Material Delivery, Derek Mills, WERK Building Modern, HAUS Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
White Oak Ceiling Material Delivery (for ceilings and door casings)

We take pride in overall vision, but also details, because they cannot exist independently for best outcomes.  Architect as Construction Manager enables better communication, streamlining the successful detailing and implementation of details like the image below.  The proportions of materials, how materials intersect or abut … the design team needs to decide on every detail.  Up-front, we define what is important to our client.  For this project, a level of design sophistication and construction follow-through was important.

White Oak Casing Details and Porcelain Tile Floor - Modern Lakehouse Lake Clearwater Indianapolis - Derek Mills, WERK Building Modern, HAUS Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
White Oak Casing Details and Porcelain Tile Floor

Custom Cabinetry

It was really exciting to see the white oak ceiling and the kitchen cabinetry going-in because we had tested so many design options.  We really enjoy leading projects from idea to implementation, especially with clients who are fun to work with.  Seeing ideas progress into built-form successfully is icing on the cake, really.

Custom Kitchen Island Construction - Cabinetry Green - John Hartman - Modern Lakehouse Lake Clearwater Indianapolis - Derek Mills, WERK Building Modern, HAUS Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Custom Kitchen Island Construction

Here below is the Poplar slatwall guardrailing system that we changed to compliment  the hidden HVAC return-air grill detail.  The trim carpentry work on this project is impeccable, as we have worked with this trade contractor for years on high-level projects.  We can’t mention their name, because we need their availability on our projects, :).

Poplar Architectural Stair Construction Details - Modern Lakehouse, Clearwater, Indianapolis, Derek Mills, WERK Building Modern, HAUS Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Poplar Architectural Stair Construction Details

Our client sent us this image on Easter Day, 2018.

Easter at Clearwater
Easter at Clearwater

 

Please check back on this project, as we’ll be adding more about the design process.  In addition, we are planning to supplement the finish photography with sunny interiors when the time is right.

01 Dec 2015
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Minimalist Modern

Minimalist Modern House is located in Indian Head Park, a suburb southwest of Chicago.   Specifically, this project on Hiawatha Lane is in an area experiencing redevelopment of preexisting home-sites.

We initially met our client in 2013 where we helped design a master plan to renovate their property in Monon, IN on Lake Schafer.  Ultimately, they decided to focus on their full-time residence in Chicago rather than their weekend property.  Indeed, to begin that process, they initially engaged with a local Chicago design firm recommended by their original contractor.

Months later, client reconnected with HAUS to request design feedback and possible project oversight to completion.  We were happy to help offer some big-picture suggestions inside-and-out to help pull the initial ideas together into a comprehensive design solution.  Albeit, our client needed final design input for their purposes and also for community approvals.

 

New Minimalist Modern House


Project Info:

Client: Svabaitis Chicago Residence
Architecture:  HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles with Joe Trojanowski Architect PC
Interior Design: Client with some HAUS advice
General Contractor: Illinois Designers & Builders
Photography: HAUS


Media Links:

Photo library: 60 cozy beds for prolonged mornings (scroll to #51 for Minimilist Modern bedroom)

Design Process – Minimalist Modern House:

Once engaged, we were able to clarify an identifiable architectural concept from preliminary development provided by Joe Trojanowski Architect PC.  HAUS and Trojanowski worked together as a team with client to pull the final concepts and details together.

Accordingly, residential construction plans in Chicago area require an architect or engineer of record (or stamp).  For this reason, it made most sense for Trojanowski to remain Architect-of-Record and finish what they started with HAUS oversight as “design architect”.

Albeit, Trojanowski had already begun a very detailed technical draft of plans.  However, these drawings were more geared toward achieving permits and less geared toward a complete architectural vision.  So for that reason, HAUS focused on conceptual ideas, materials, and related details resolution inside and out.  Concurrently, Trojanowski focused on permit requirements, technical drawings, and structural coordination.

Front Elevation Rendering -Minimalist Modern House - Indian Head Park - HAUS Architecture, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Front Elevation Rendering -Minimalist Modern House – Indian Head Park – HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles

Rendering views completed above and below by HAUS included suggestions for exterior materials, exterior window adjustments, some subtle refinements to parapet heights, and wall locations.  Ironically, this design process was similar to many of our renovation projects.  This is because we already had a preexisting design that needed some review.  So, as with many of our renovation projects, our primary objective was to essentially simplify and edit.  We worked to clarify relationships and connections inside and out to help inspire decisions for material and form within the preexisting massing and layout concepts already established.

Design Details

On the inside, we made a few suggestions and refinements to master suite and other room layout details.  Later, we reviewed client shop drawings and provided feedback  on proposed interior concepts for kitchen, fireplace, stair, and built-ins for client review.

The contractor with client also had some great suggestions on how to execute some of the details along the way.

Rear Elevation Rendering -Minimalist Modern House - Indian Head Park - HAUS Architecture, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Rear Elevation Rendering – Minimalist Modern House – Indian Head Park – HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles

 

Construction Kicks-Off:

Client did not commission HAUS for regular construction-phase consulting.  However, we did keep in-touch with an ongoing design dialogue and some limited design consulting along the way.

As HAUS is located in Indianapolis, and the project is 3.5 hour one-way drive, HAUS visited the site semi-yearly.  Without a doubt, we were happy to swing by the site on Easter and Thanksgiving while passing through for holiday family visits in the area to see progress.  Also, it was great to continue the design dialogue during the construction phase.

 

IMG_3028
Foundation Walls Set – New Minimalist Modern House, Indian Head Park, Chicago, Illinois

Our client insisted the home be durable, long-lasting, and energy-efficient.  For this reason, he built the structure with concrete foundation walls, steel beams, and CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls.  Most certainly, the home would have cost less with wood or maybe even SIPS (structural insulated panel system) walls.  However, our client wanted more heft, durability, and sound isolation.

As seen below, radiant heated floors encompass the entire lower level.  Here, trades have installed the hydronic radiant system prior to concrete slab placement.

 

New Modern House 3 - Radiant Flooring Installation
Minimalist Modern House – Radiant Flooring Installation

Exterior Details

As we can see, all exterior walls are CMU (concrete masonry unit) construction, at Owner request.  At this stage, Owner was still investigating exterior cladding options.  As our initial concepts assumed a rainscreen, non-masonry cladding, exterior details did not include any masonry bearing ledges.  For these reasons, we assumed a low area of concrete footings would remain exposed, and emphasized this feature accordingly.  For example, referring to the back rendering elevations, we continued the exposed concrete base to wrap one side of deck and provide base for the outdoor fireplace.  In comparing renderings to actual construction, team achieved portions of the original intent, while some details were added or tweaked.

IMG_5989
CMU Walls Underway

 

This photo below is one of our favorite construction views, capturing the overall massing of the house on the property.  It gives us a feel for final solid and void of exterior wall design.

IMG_7482[1]
CMU Installation Nears Completion

On the backside, the sheltering porch is taking shape.  At upstairs balcony, we had suggested elimination of the wall offset for a simpler flush upper story condition.  However, this was not modified, as we would have had to add another steel beam to support the CMU.  Actual installation keeps the upper and lower story CMU bearing wall alignments as shown.  Flat awning is included to keep some precipitation off the Nanawall balcony doors.

New Modern House 3
Progress on back-side of home, including covered porch, balcony, and freestanding fireplace-grill

 

New Modern House 3 - camo pick-up
Camo pick-up

 

Exterior Windows

From the interior, many of the windows are full-height.  Other than sliding glass walls (Nanawall), all exterior windows are Fleetwood Windows & Doors.  Many of the operable windows are awnings.  Their size allows for emergency egress from bedrooms.  This particular view below is from Study-Playroom.

New Modern House 3 - room with a view
Room with a view

 

New Modern House 3 - tub carved from block of solid stone
Tub carved from block of solid stone

 

High-Velocity HVAC Sytem

As seen here, a high-veolicity HVAC system is incorporated to supplement the hydronic radiant system downstairs.  This system requires smaller openings and shafts for air movement, and lower profile outlets and inlets throughout the spaces.  Most of the supply ducts are flexible plastic-wire wrapped in fiberglass and foil coating.  The design and installation of this type of system when combined with hydronic radiant requires a level of expertise beyond the norm to ensure optimal performance and control appropriate for the locale.

New Modern House 3 - high velocity HVAC
High Velocity HVAC

 

New Modern House 3 - high velocity HVAC
High Velocity HVAC

 

Exterior Insulation

Owner added 2×4 wood-stud furring to all perimeter walls with open-cell foam insulation.  Roof structure received minimum R24 closed-cell board insulation over deck and under roof membrane.  Underside of roof deck received minimum R30 open cell foam.  Below we can see installation of NanaWall sliding doors with access to Master Bedroom roof balcony to overlooking backyard.

New Modern House 3 - Master Suite Balcony Nanawall
Master Suite Balcony Nanawall

 

Owner maintained the two-tone exterior, but decided to change from cement board or metal cladding to masonry on both the light and darker sections.  At the time of this photo, Owner had not yet made a final decision on the lighter material (2-story volume).  Also, the outdoor fireplace base was built with CMU base instead of concrete per original renderings.  Brick appears to possibly be Queen-sized for less depth than modular.  Since we had originally designed for siding/rainscreen, we discussed adding steel lintels anchored to CMU to serve as masonry bearing since we did not include foundation brick ledges.

New Modern House 3 - Back Elevation Progress
Minimalist Modern House – Back Elevation Brick Progress

 

New Modern House 3 - Back Elevation Progress
Minimalist Modern House – Back Elevation Brick Progress

Product Details – Materials/Vendors/Manufacturers:

Interior doors:  DILA Effebiquattro Newport (Italy)
Door levers:  Serozzetta / Carlisle Brass (UK)
Main entrance door:  Doors for Builders (Poland)
Windows:  Fleetwood
Patio and Balcony Glass doors:  NanaWall
Garage Doors:  C.H.I. Overhead Doors
Floors:  European White Oak 8 inch treated with Rubio Monocoat – Smoke color
Kitchen Cabinets:  Stay-Straight Manufacturing
1st floor room dividing wall closet:  Silver Birch Cabinetry
Glass work by:  Glass Innovation
Stairs:  Europiron Group / Illinois Designers & Builders
Deck and balcony:  Azek
Exterior concrete cladding:  Techo Bloc Travertina
Driveway Pavers:  County Materials / Elements Timeless

 

Please check-back, as we will be adding more details to the story!

08 Dec 2018
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Cigar Room Addition

We have recently completed a Cigar Room Addition for our clients in Brendonwood Historic District on Indianapolis’ northeast side.

Once again, we are working on a Midcentury Modern gem designed by the architects of the firm, Vonnegut, Wright, and Yeager.  In fact, we have learned that Edward Pierre of Pierre & Wright (at the time), designed the original Midcentury Modern home for the Indianapolis Home Show in 1954.  More recently, a prior owner made updates before selling it to our clients, who are local mental health professionals.

In essence, our clients simply wanted a cozy place to get away; an isolated retreat to play piano, listen to music, and smoke cigars.


Project Info – Cigar Room – A Midcentury Modern Addition:

Architecture/Renderings: HAUS | Architecture (Paul Reynolds)
Construction Management: WERK | Building Modern (Paul Reynolds)
Interior Design:  MW Harris
Windows: Marvin + Franklin Window & Door
Dedicated HVAC: HC Climate
Photography: HAUS + Jamie Sangar Photography


Media Links:

Indianapolis Monthly:  Reality Check – What $550k gets you in Brendonwood (18 July 2014)

Mod Abode:  Cigar Room – An Escape

Ceaserstone – The Interior Collective:  Cigar Room Retreat

Indianapolis Monthly has featured our client in a recent edition of Indianapolis Monthly’s “Open Door” feature, so we’ll be sure to link it here when available!

Cigar Room – A Midcentury Modern Addition – Design Process

Background

Owner originally began the project design with Steve Zintel of Summit Design Group, but they were not able to finish the project, perhaps because their builder partner bowed-out.  So, HAUS took those initial ideas and worked toward a final, simple solution respecting the pre-existing structure and Midcentury style.  We spent some time engaging a longer-term site plan that included some interesting ideas for outdoor space, but ultimately, the Owner priority was the Phase One Cigar Room project.

We will be sharing some renderings of the cool Master Plan ideas and other interesting tidbits before long, so please check back for these updates!

 

Piano Keys - Humidor - Midcentury Modern Addition - Brendonwood, Indianapolis - Christopher Short, Paul Reynolds, Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles - WERK | Building Modern - Paul Reynolds, Project Manager
Piano Keys – Cigar Room – A Midcentury Modern Addition – Brendonwood, Indianapolis (photo by Jamie Sangar Photography)

 

Blue Wallcovering Detail - Cigar Room - Midcentury Modern Addition - Brendonwood, Indianapolis - Christopher Short, Paul Reynolds, Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles - WERK | Building Modern - Paul Reynolds, Project Manager
Blue Wallcovering Detail – Cigar Room – A Midcentury Modern Addition – Brendonwood Historic District (photo by Jamie Sangar Photography)

 

Bar Cabinet Detail - Cigar Room - Midcentury Modern Addition - Brendonwood, Indianapolis - Christopher Short, Paul Reynolds, Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles - WERK | Building Modern - Paul Reynolds, Project Manager
Bar Cabinet Detail (Red Gum Wood) – Midcentury Modern Addition – Brendonwood Historic District (photo by Jamie Sangar Photography)

 

Cabinet + Humidor Detail - Cigar Room - Midcentury Modern Addition - Brendonwood, Indianapolis - Christopher Short, Paul Reynolds, Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles - WERK | Building Modern - Paul Reynolds, Project Manager
Cabinet + Humidor Detail – Midcentury Modern Addition – Brendonwood Historic District (photo by Jamie Sangar Photography)

 

Liquor Bottle Detail - Cigar Room - Midcentury Modern Addition - Brendonwood, Indianapolis - Christopher Short, Paul Reynolds, Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles - WERK | Building Modern - Paul Reynolds, Project Manager
Liquor Bottle Detail – A Midcentury Modern Addition – Brendonwood Historic District (photo by Jamie Sangar Photography)

 

17 Apr 2018
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Modern Colonial

Check out this new Modern Colonial design that broke-ground in spring 2017 located in Towne Oak Estates just north of Coxhill Gardens.

Our physician clients with young children were looking to establish roots with a long-term home to raise their family on the north side.  They wanted their home to stand-out but fit-in.  In addition, they were interested in clean-lines, but within a traditional framework or style.  Many of the images they shared could be considered transitional, and most included a rich but simple material palette of wood and masonry paired with clean white walls, dark-painted window frames void of wall trims, and colorful culture-specific artworks and idols.

Vastu shastra was and is an important consideration in the design of this home (but not quite as important to our clients as the grandparents).  We integrated these principles for many major design considerations, but not all.  At HAUS, we like to latch-on to program-elements that are particularly unique to each client.  For this particular partnership, the Puja space was an aspect that we could design around.  We were able to highlight the Puja as an architectural feature accentuated on the front elevation with a contrasting natural wood material inside and out.

Please check back as we will be adding to the story and description with words and photos.


Project Info – New Modern Colonial House:

Architecture/Interior Design: HAUS | Architecture
Construction Management: Gradison
Renderings: HAUS | Architecture
Photography: HAUS | Architecture


Design Process:

Front Exterior Elevation features modern entry with flat roof separating primary structure from Garage. Principles of Vaastu were utilized to include the entry orientation, Pooja prayer room, other details. Garage Modern Colonial House - Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Front exterior elevation features modern entry with flat roof separating primary structure from garage.  At Owner request, design-team integrated principles of vastu shastra to include main entry orientation, puja prayer room, and other details.  Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana

 

Rear Exterior Elevation features rear mini-courtyard with built-in grille station and chimney, loft balcony, and walkout access from three sides. Mini-Patio will step down to future pool in backyard - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Rear exterior elevation features rear elevated mini-courtyard with built-in grille station and chimney, loft balcony, and walkout access from three sides.  Private court will step down to future pool in backyard.  Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana

Construction Process – New Modern Colonial House

Excavation + Footings

Ground has been broken and footings cast - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Build team has broken-ground and cast footings (spring 2017).

 

Ground has been broken and footings cast - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Ground is broken and footings are cast (spring 2017).

 

Cast-in-place Basement Walls

Basement Walls Cast (view from rear/backyard) - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Basement Walls Cast (view from rear/backyard) (spring 2017).

 

Basement foundation walls and slab have been cast and slab joints cut - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Basement foundation walls and sawcuts complete (spring 2017).

 

Framing Begins

Wood floor framing is underway - this photo captures the east bay window, which was reduced in scope for budgetary reasons - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Wood floor framing is underway.  This photo captures the east bay window.  Team reduced walk-out scope for budgetary reasons (spring 2017).

 

View from southeast captures first floor wall framing progress - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
View from southeast captures first floor wall framing progress (summer 2017).

 

First floor wall sheathing underway in this west elevation - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
First floor wall sheathing underway in this west elevation (summer 2017).

 

Southeast elevation captures first floor wall sheathing completion - the current form could easily be a one-story modern home, but for this project, we are just getting started - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Southeast elevation captures first floor wall sheathing completion – (summer 2017).

 

Southeast elevation captures first floor wall sheathing completion - the current form could easily be a one-story modern home, but for this project, we are just getting started - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Southeast elevation captures first floor wall sheathing completion.  This form could easily be a one-story modern home.  However, this home will be two-story.  Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, IN – (summer 2017).

 

Second Floor Framing Begins

Front northwest view captures 2nd Level wall framing progress - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Front northwest view captures 2nd Level wall framing progress – Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana (summer 2017).

 

Southwest elevation captures second floor framing, sheathing, and weather-resistive-barrier appliation - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Southwest elevation captures second floor framing, sheathing, and weather-resistive-barrier application.  Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana (summer 2017).

 

Front approach view with new roof framing underway - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Front approach view with new roof framing underway – Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana (fall 2017).

 

West, southwest progress view with new roof framing underway - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
West, southwest progress view with new roof framing underway.  Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana (fall 2017).

 

Roof Framing Nears Completion

South progress view - great to see the roofs going-on and how the massing feels - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
In this south-yard view, it’s great to see the roofs going-on and the massing feels good.  Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana (fall 2017).

 

West elevation view with new roof framing mostly completed - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
West elevation view with new roof framing mostly completed.  Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana (fall 2017).

 

Weathered-in

Front exterior elevations as weathered-in awaiting roofing and brick - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Front exterior framing is nearing completion.  Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana (winter 2017-18)

 

Front entry detail view - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Front entry detail view – Modern Colonial House – Towne Oak Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana (winter 2017-18).

 

View from Pooja/Home Office area directly south through patio doors - loft looks down from above - fireplace to the right will span both levels - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
View from Puja/Home Office area directly south through patio doors – loft looks down from above – fireplace to the right will span both levels (winter 2017-18).

 

Window Installations

South elevation progress with window installtion underway - Plastic area to the right will be clad in greenhouse glass walls and roof - Built-in Grille area has yet to frame - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Window installation is underway.  Plastic area to the right will be clad in greenhouse glass walls and roof.  Built-in grille area has yet to frame (winter 2017-18).

 

Southeast view as we await the corner greenhouse installation - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Southeast view as we await the corner greenhouse installation (winter 2017-18).

 

Interior view from living area looking to dining/kitchen area - kitchen to have cabinets above the horizontal windows - stair to left is a temporary construction stair - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Here is an nterior view from living area looking to dining/kitchen area.  Kitchen wall will have cabinets above the horizontal windows.  Stair to left is a temporary construction stair (winter 2017-18).

 

Brick Veneer Installation

Owner selected a low-cost brick masonry product that will receive an off-white paint coating when completed - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Owner selected a low-cost brick masonry product that will receive an off-white paint coating when completed (spring 2018).

 

Brick installation is nearing completion and awaits painted finish (west elevation) - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
Brick installation is nearing completion and awaits painted finish (west elevation) (spring 2018).

 

Rear, south-facing elevation - Owner selected a low-cost brick masonry product that will receive an off-white paint coating when completed - Modern Colonial House - Towne Oaks Estates, Steffe Drive, Carmel, Indiana - Christopher Short, Derek Mills, Paul Reynolds, Indianapolis Architects, HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
At rear, south-facing elevation, Owner selected a low-cost brick masonry product.  This is because it will receive an off-white paint coating when completed (spring 2018).

 

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We will be adding to the story, so please check-back for updates!

Next steps in construction will include back greenhouse wrap, painted brick, and interior progress now that drywall has been completed!

 

11 Aug 2016
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G BLOC MIXED USE

HAUS is working on G BLOC MIXED USE, a new development in Broad Ripple North Village that includes a mix of commercial office, urban lofts, and covered parking and is located on a small city block at 841 E 64th Street.  We have enjoyed the public process that began in early 2016 and have been working toward a solution that most effectively meets the multifaceted urban design goals of this awesome location.  It has been an engaging and stimulating dialogue with the neighborhood and the City in an effort to balance the desire for pedestrian engagement and more mixed-use density fitting Broad Ripple’s Envision Plan while also managing flood-plain requirements.  The location (formerly 6367 and 6371 Guilford) is just a few feet from the Monon Trail and borders Guilford, 64th, Cornell, and Main.


Project Info – G BLOC Mixed Use:

Architecture/Interior Design/Renderings/Photography: HAUS | Architecture
Construction Management: WERK | Building Modern
Leasing:  Thomas English Retail Real Estate
Developer: G BLOCK, LLC


Media Links:

Indy Midtown Magazine:  G BLOC mixed-use development

IBJ-Indianapolis Business Journal:  Three-story mixed-use project in Broad Ripple gets balky feedback from city

G BLOC MIXED USE – PreDesign Process

Background

2014-2015 – We most recently became interested in the Broad Ripple North Village area while working with one of our clients to design and build a new brownstone-inspired home on Ferguson Street.  This particular client lives in an exclusive gated community in Carmel, and were about to become empty-nesters.  For that reason, they wanted to live in a vibrant, walkable community with lots of amenities and restaurants, and acquired property to make that happen.  Some immediate plans changed for that project and it went on-hold, but it’s still out there and we are looking forward to a re-engagement.

2016 – We gained control of the properties at 6367 and 6371 Guilford, and began conceptualizing development options.  Our first BRVA Land-Use and Development Committee meeting was in March 2016 to introduce initial ideas to the BRVA Zoning and Land-Use Committee to begin a constructive dialogue and gather information.  This scheme included 30 loft apartments on levels 3 and 4, office space on level 2, and primarily parking on level 1.

BRVA was good about communicating their concerns (parking should be out of sight but enough provided possibly to exceed the zoning requirement, pedestrian engagement is very important, please include a retail component, we don’t really want to knock-down the historic homes on the site, how tall is it, and we’re not sure we like your design quite yet).  This was a good introduction to community stakeholders, and we went to work from there to respond to the mostly constructive feedback that we received.

Early Scheme Southeast Corner (March 2016) - G BLOC MIXED USE Development - Broad Ripple North Village - Urban Infill - Indianapolis - Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect, HAUS Architecture For Modern Lifestyles, WERK | Building Modern, Thomas English Retail Real Estate
Early Scheme Southeast Corner (March 2016) – G BLOC MIXED USE Development – Broad Ripple North Village – Indianapolis

 

Public Process

Our next round of development focused on concealing the base-level parking and integrating a ground-level retail component per BRVA request.  We also had time to develop the architectural concepts a bit more.  We could see that parking may be the biggest challenge in enabling enough density for project feasibility.  This next concept incorporated a mix of two-story townhomes (possibly live-work), a reduced number of loft apartments, office, small retail or cafe, and parking.

BRVA still appeared to have strong opposition to the proposal.  For instance they suggested still not enough pedestrian engagement, too massive, don’t want to demolish existing structures, and concerns with parking.  Also, BRVA did not appear to consider the significant challenge that the flood-fringe factor will play.  On our side, we knew that satisfying everyone was going to a monumental challenge, especially if we counted ourselves and financial feasibility.

Southwest Corner Early Scheme (June 2016) - G BLOC MIXED USE Development - Broad Ripple North Village - Urban Infill - Indianapolis - Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect, HAUS Architecture For Modern Lifestyles, WERK | Building Modern, Thomas English Retail Real Estate
Southwest Corner Early Scheme (June 2016) – G BLOC MIXED USE Development – Broad Ripple North Village – Urban Infill – Indianapolis

 

Design Character

Architecturally, we began to define what the building should be (in our eyes).  BRVA did not agree (“it’s too boxy”  “too modern”, “too tall”, “not enough pedestrian engagement”, live-work will never work”).  The sites were in zone C-4, which allows up to 65-foot height; however, we proposed to rezone to the new MU-2 Category per Indy ReZone, adopted in April 2016.  MU-2 allows up to 35′ in height, but BRVA Envision plan recommends up to 4-stories and 40-feet.

We ended-up taking a break in summer 2016, and then came back to BRVA in November.  We had refined the concepts some, but no major differences from the prior meeting.  Some on the BRVA were hoping for more significant design concept revisions.   This was our 4th trip to see the land-use committee.  From here, we engaged zoning consultants and submitted our applications with the City (late 2016-early 2017).

Early Scheme Southwest Corner (November 2016) - G BLOC MIXED USE Development - Broad Ripple North Village - Urban Infill - Indianapolis - Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect, HAUS Architecture For Modern Lifestyles, WERK | Building Modern, Thomas English Retail Real Estate
Early Scheme Southwest Corner (November 2016) – G BLOC MIXED USE Development – Broad Ripple North Village – Urban Infill – Indianapolis

BRVA Support

2017 – Planning staff opposed the development proposal (“too intense for its location”, “parking concerns”).  After several meetings, it became clear that staff was not going to support the rezone or variance.  Our only chance was to do what was necessary to achieve BRVA support and proceed with the City process.  We didn’t expect hearing officer to contradict staff, so we looked forward to Board of Zoning Appeals hearing.

So, we went “back to the drawing board” again to see how we could create a more “village-friendly” architecture.  We redesigned the exterior for a more “village-friendly” character and scale.  In addition to adding gabled roofs, we deleted the 4th floor and raised the main floor to accommodate more storefront.  With these changes, BRVA voted to support the project, but only with a long-list of agreed stipulations.

Thank you to Colleen Fanning, Thomas Healy, and other local business owners for your support, including writing letters and speaking on behalf of our rezoning efforts.

 

Planning Department + Board of Zoning Appeals

We were not able to achieve City Planning Department staff or hearing officer support as of 08.10.17.  On 09.06.17, the Board of Zoning Appeals Commission voted to support the rezone from C-4 to MU-2 (5-3 vote).  However, they voted against the variances (building height + clear sight triangle) (3-5 vote).  On the bright-side, City did not adopt BRVA stipulations since they did not approve variances.  In hindsight, this may have been the most beneficial outcome for this development.

We still really don’t understand why staff was against our proposal.  Above all, we understood a primary intent of Indy ReZone was to encourage higher-density development in urban areas, discouraging sprawl.  The resistance to an additional 5-feet of building height and maintaining clear site triangle is dumbfounding (to us) at best.  We documented 40-50 instances in the immediate area that don’t follow current clear sight requirements.  And City has approved several new development proposals much greater height, including 70-feet directly across the Monon Trail.  The clear-site triangle requirement is automobile-centric, which is contrary to initiatives focused on the pedestrian.  Each of the intersections abutting our property have all-way stops; therefore, there is no need for strict adherence to clear sight triangle.  Its adherence seems in conflict with the creation of a nicely-scaled pedestrian experience.

Flood Fringe Area

Despite our initial claims to the contrary, neither BRVA or Planning Department appreciated the significant hardship for developing the site.  This hardship pertained to the flood plain and associated FEMA requirements.  On the technical design side, this was all a fascinating challenge.  On the development side, it was a major hurdle and hardship on most levels.  Certain members of the Board of Zoning Appeals tried to coax us to highlight the flood zone hardships more-so.  Without a doubt, we didn’t emphasize that issue to our advantage in the variance hearing.    We’ll be sharing more about the what we learned during this process, so please check-back for updates.

We presented the gable-roof design below to City + Board of Zoning Appeals.

Early Scheme Southwest Corner (Sept 2017) - G BLOC MIXED USE Development - Broad Ripple North Village - Urban Infill - Indianapolis - Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect, HAUS Architecture For Modern Lifestyles, WERK | Building Modern, Thomas English Retail Real Estate
Early Scheme Southwest Corner (Sept 2017) – G BLOC MIXED USE Development – Broad Ripple North Village – Urban Infill – Indianapolis

G BLOC MIXED USE – Design Process

Final Design + Building Permits

Since achieving the rezone, we have developed a completely new design concept (again).  This new direction meets the now-defined zoning criteria, including the clear-site triangle, parking, transparency, and height.  Furthermore, we have designed the scheme to accommodate a future 4th floor.  As we delved deeper into zoning exceptions, we learned to leverage certain components, including skylights, parapets, towers, and surrounding grade.  However, we’ll still need a variance for the future story.

Zoning rules have forced us to adapt and modify some pedestrian-engagement amenities in favor of other requirements.  For instance, height limitations and flood-plain requirements forced us to implement some of our original directions.  In addition to sinking the base level partially into the earth, we moved the primary building entry back to the northeast corner oriented to the Monon Trail.  Despite the numerous challenges, we are excited about the refined direction as the newest design solution is a true contextual response shaped by numerous forces (physical, cultural, political).  As of 12.31.17, we have the newest and final design concepts just about completed.

Main Building Entrance North Elevation Design Development (Dec 2017) - G BLOC MIXED USE Development - Broad Ripple North Village - Urban Infill - Indianapolis - Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect, HAUS Architecture For Modern Lifestyles, WERK | Building Modern, Thomas English Retail Real Estate
Main Building Entrance North Elevation Design Development (Dec 2017) – G BLOC MIXED USE Development

 

2018 – During the CD stage, we have made further refinements to the design that we will be sharing soon.

 

G BLOC MIXED USE – Construction Process

Permitting – It was a long, drawn-out permit review process, but finally achieved permits in late summer 2018.  We’ll share some of the learning from the permit process another time.

We completed site demolition + mass excavation in early October 2018.

We are beginning site mobilization for layout and excavation, and will finally be pouring footers by late November.

 

Please check back for updates, as we’ll be keeping this post up-to-date!

13 Nov 2016
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Scandinavian Rustic Cabin

Scandinavian Rustic Cabin located in Carmel, IN began master planning first of the year 2015, and re-construction was completed before the fall holidays.

The design of this 1990’s shingle-style rustic cabin was primarily based around the desire for a more open and light-filled interior, with better connections to its beautiful site.  It was a really interesting and ongoing design-dialogue … how to effectively mix pre-existing rustic features (log-cabin walls, brick floors) with new modern features (cabinetry, fireplace surrounds, details, hardware).  The same questions came up over and over for each specification, finish, and detail.  Should it lean more rustic, more modern, or somewhere in-between?  The contrast between rustic and modern details and materials provides for a rich and unique experience inside and out with a result that in many ways reveals a Scandinavian vibe mixed with Rustic.

We have just begun to document this project, so please check-back as we will be posting periodic updates, Owner feedback, and backstory.


Project Info – Scandinavian Rustic Cabin:

Architecture/Interior Design/Renderings/Photography: HAUS | Architecture
Construction Management: Blaze Construction


 

Progress – Scandinavian Rustic Cabin

Owner forwarded an evening photo of the living room fireplace that we modified with a new hearth + steel cladding and light reveal – #ambience

Scandinavian Rustic Cabin Modern Steel Fireplace - HAUS Architecture, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Scandinavian Rustic Cabin Modern Steel Fireplace
12 Apr 2016
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New Modern House 1

New Modern House 1 located in Zionsville, IN broke ground in fall 2015 for family of four seeking an energy efficient, modest, modern dwelling responding emphatically to its site #Copperwood.

This design, located on a 20 acre lot with natural habitat and wetlands, features open concept planning with distinct components for Living, Bedrooms, and Garage.  Major design element includes a dramatic wing roof overhanging primary indoor living spaces and Airstream port, with Airstream functioning as Home Office + Guest Suite while docked.  In addition, kitchen space features front and back areas with pass-through to serve outdoor entertaining.  And lower level features architectural stair, north bay light, and regulation table tennis area for nationally-rated Owner.

Mostly low-tech passive and active green-building strategies were implemented throughout, with the home achieving a HERS Performance Rating of 43, which is 60% better than a standard new energy-code-compliant home.  Smart Home Technology is used to control lighting, HVAC, and security from the Owner’s mobile devices.

We completed this project in late September 2016 – please check-back as we will be posting periodic updates and Owner feedback.

Media Links:

The AIA Home Tour Committee selected Copperwood to be on the AIA Home Tour on September 16-17, 2017.  We enjoyed seeing so many of our friends, colleagues, clients on the tour!  Here below are some media links featuring Copperwood.

Dezeen Magazine – Haus wraps low-lying Indiana residence in thermally treated ash

HOME – Indianapolis Monthly – For Spacious Skies

Dezeen Magazine – Five of the best houses in Indiana on Dezeen

American Hardwood Export Council – HAUS Architects creates a modern family dwelling with thermally-modified American ash

18 Elegant Modern Bedroom Interiors You Will Not Want to Leave

Inhabitat.com – Light-filled Indianapolis Home is a base for Airstream adventurers

Il Commercio Edile – The ash tree for an American Dream Home

Zionsville Home Featured on Architect’s Home Tour

Dwell Magazine Editor’s Pick (Copperwood)

diarioDESIGN:  The wooden house that adapts to the terrain and the climate

COVER - Indianapolis Monthly HOME Magazine 2018 - Room With a View - Glass walls and oversized windows offer stunning vistas at this Zionsville home - New Modern House 1 - Christopher Short, Architect - HAUS | Architecture For Modern Lifestyles
COVER – Indianapolis Monthly HOME Magazine 2018

Project Info – New Modern House 1:

Architecture/Interior Design: HAUS | Architecture (Chris Short, Derek Mills, Kevin Swan, Rachelle Swan)
Construction Management: WERK | Building Modern (Derek Mills + Chris Short)
Renderings: HAUS | Architecture
Exterior Finish Photography: HAUS | Architecture
Process Photography: HAUS | Architecture + Kevin Swan as noted
Interior Finish Photography: HAUS | Architecture + The Home Aesthetic
Featured: 2017 AIA Home Tour


Design Process – New Modern House 1

New Modern House 1 - Copperwood Residence, Zionsville - Architect Sketch - HAUS Architecture - Christopher Short
New Modern House 1 – Architect Sketch

Progress – New Modern House 1

No special ceremonies – let’s get digging.  Actual site grading varied from available GIS maps, but we were able to make the desired adjustments to coordinate with adjacent wetlands and grades.

New Modern House 1 - Ceremonial Ground-Breaking Shovel - HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Ceremonial Ground-Breaking Shovel

 

Foundations – New Modern House 1

During excavation, we were able to clarify and work-through the issues related to existing grading.  We ended-up realizing some savings by making the right design decisions on the fly.  It’s critical that the architect is involved in every phase of the construction to make the right decisions consistent with DESIGN INTENT.  Despite some delays, we were able to install and backfill footings prior to freezing weather.

New Modern House 1 - Footings Formed - HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Footings Formed

 

Retaining Walls – New Modern House 1

The large footings in the foreground are for the Airstream canopy area retaining walls.  Initially we had a number of retaining walls on the project, but reduced a few to save on costs.  Negotiating the site grades was an interesting process, but we were happy to have saved some effort and cost with some of the decisions.

New Modern House 1 - Footings Poured - HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Footings Poured

 

New Modern House 1 - Wall Forms (or Stonehenge) - HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Basement Concrete Wall Forms (or Stonehenge)

 

Basement Foundation Walls – New Modern House 1

It’s interesting how the residential market differs from the commercial market regarding design and construction.  It seems the structural engineers and residential trades are often at odds.  Having come from a commercial architecture background, and now working predominantly in the residential marketplace – the differences are very evident.  Whenever we have a structural engineer collaborate on our unique projects, the concrete trades in particular often have differing opinions on best techniques.  It’s interesting to learn the different opinions – many related to costs.  Some like to comment about “over-design”.  Would we rather the structural engineer “under-design”?  I don’t think so.

In the case below, the concrete contractor wanted to add a few counterfort walls to reinforce the long foundation wall.  One reason was to support the length during backfilling operations if we decided to backfill prior to floor structure completion.  Once we install floor structure, we achieve adequate lateral support without the counterfort walls.  Some opined that we could have done with less rebar reinforcement.  Sure could have, but we stuck with the structural engineer recommendations.

New Modern House 1 - Wall Forms - HAUS Architecture, WERK Buildng Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Basement Concrete Wall Forms

 

New Modern House 1 - Forms Pulled - WERK Building Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Basement Wall Forms Pulled

 

Framing Begins – New Modern House 1

We considered various methods of project delivery, construction techniques, and client priorities relative to project costs.  To be sure, we and our client do respect the advantages of a prefab process (controlled environment, fast site erection), but we chose instead to stick-build.  All things considered, we felt this method was going to be the most cost-effective and logical based on the overall design (open-concept bay widths, heavy timber, large Airstream canopy).  However, even though were ready to frame by late December, we had some delays with weather and framer availability.  So ultimately, we ended-up starting actual site framing work in early February 2016.  So looking-back, maybe prefab would have benefited the process – if feasible with our design.  The trick is, we didn’t design it from the beginning with prefab in-mind, which is important in making that technique feasible.

New Modern House 1 - Derek Mills Coordinating Framing in January - HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
New Modern House 1 – Derek Mills Coordinating Framing in January

 

framing speeds forward - WERK Building Modern
Framing Speeds Forward

 

Crane Heavy Timber - WERK Building Modern - HAUS Architecture, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Crane Heavy Timber

 

Lumber Sourcing – New Modern House 1

We didn’t anticipate having to source the heavy timber for the project via out-of-state suppliers, but the local lumber yards said they didn’t have access to what we needed.  Happily, we were able to find what we needed from American Pole and Timber out of Texas.  We can’t say it was the greenest way to source the material – I guess if we were doing this project in the Pacific Northwest, we would not have had a problem.  Part of the challenge is that we needed treated wood for all exposed wood.  We needed 32′ long 2x12s treated, which was not readily available in that length.  Texas cut that material for us out of logs, and since their other 6×6 timbers were a better bargain than local suppliers, we decided to load-up the truck with some additional lumber to cover some of our other needs.

New Modern House 1 - Yellow Boots - Heavy Timber - HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern, Derek Mills
Yellow Boots – Heavy Timber

 

Skylight Framing – New Modern House 1

We strategically placed a few skylights into the bedroom wing roof to maximize natural light in the right places – this particular opening is a 3-skylight-wide slot in the Master Bedroom ceiling primarily over the master bed headwall, which floats short of the ceiling and separates bedroom from bathroom.  Most of the skylights are fixed, but a couple are motorized to allow stack-effect ventilation.  Light and panoramic views achieve a dramatic engagement with the site.  Stay tuned for finish photos of these spaces in a few months.

New Modern House 1 - Skylight Framing - HAUS Architecture, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Skylight Framing

 

Front Entry #Copperwood - New Modern House 1 - HAUS Architecture, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect, WERK Building Modern
Front Entry Framing Progress – New Modern House 1

 

New Modern House 1 - Framing Progress - HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Framing Progress

 

Exterior Wood Siding Installation – New Modern House 1

Framers are working their way around the house on the wood siding installations.  The thermally-modified Ash is really beautiful, so client is debating whether to finish the siding to maintain the nice warm tone.  Ultimately they decided we will let it weather to grey.  We ended-up coming up a bit short on the siding, and had to wait a few months to get enough right-sized Ash to finish the job.  This caused some delays on metal copings and some other areas, but on the bright-side, we ended up getting some extra material that we were able to use in a few places on the interior.

New Modern House 1 - Thermally Treated Siding Installation - HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Thermally Treated Siding Installation

 

Exterior Progress – New Modern House 1

For the most part, the details are coming-out as planned.  We have some work to do here and there, but overall we are pleased with how things are coming along.  We were fortunate to acquire the black cement board siding from the supplier, as they had discontinued black.  Luckily, they just happened to have a small quantity still available in-stock.  This prefinished cement board siding installation requires precision and patience.  We need to light-sanded and seal all cut edges prior to installation, so it is not fast-going.  For the exposed steel columns and brackets, we have decided to leave the galvanized finish exposed instead of painting them black.  The roof-framing members are treated 2x12s and the supporting glulams are treated 7″ x 16″ that we mostly over-sized for scale/appearance.

New Modern House 1 - siding detail - HAUS Architecture
Rainscreen Cladding Detail

 

Airstream Shelter – New Modern House 1

A major design driver for this project was our client’s passion for travel, and particularly, the integration of their Airstream, “Annie”, into the design.  Regarding Annie, early in the design process we established that Annie be – 1) Protected, and 2) Functionally-integrated into the design.  We achieved each and more.  With Annie located on the west side of the property (just a few steps from the Kitchen and garage), the soaring wing roof structure protects Annie while providing abundant shelter from the hot west sun (for the house).

New Modern House 1 - Airstream Shelter - HAUS Architecture, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Canopy Roof Shelters Airstream Trailer

Entry Bridge – New Modern House 1

Each client and each site bring a unique set of design opportunities to the table.  The raised buildable portion of this particular site had sloping grades and an abandoned gas pipeline running through the desired house location.  The initial and ultimate design concepts deferred to the pipeline, oriented house to receive the south light + best views, and gracefully addressed the sloping site.

Garage wing to the right and bedroom wing to the left frame the north-facing entry.  The angle from bedroom wing to garage wing mimics the adjacent pipeline.  We wanted to bring natural light into the lower level, which we achieved with the north bay.  And then the architectural bridge spans the bay to access the front door.  We are excited about the finishing details of the canopies not yet complete, which includes heavy timber posts and beams with treated glulam beams spanning the basement clerestory.

To achieve the structural requirements for diagonal bracing, we have incorporated galvanized bracing of rods with clevis and turnbuckles, while bridge guardrails utilize stainless-steel cable-rail infill.  The basement clearstory area steps down to lower level with a couple of 30″ tall landscaped platforms to eliminate the need for guardrails.  The light achieved helps make the lower level a desirable living space – stay tuned for photos/progress of the lower level, architectural stair, and canopy details.

New Modern House 1 - Copperwood New Modern Entry Bridge - HAUS Architecture, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect, WERK Building Modern
Copperwood New Modern Entry Bridge

 

New Modern House 1 - Canopy Kit of Parts - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Front Entry Canopy Kit of Parts

 

New Modern House 1 - Custom Hardware Detail - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Custom Hardware Detail

Rainscreen Siding – New Modern House 1

We are really happy with how the project is coming along and it is great to see things coming together mostly as planned.  It’s important that we protect the design vision in built-form.  Then, from there, we fit the expected quality within the agreed budget.  The trades for the project have never worked on anything like this from an overall design standpoint, so it has been a key asset having HAUS, the Architect managing the construction via WERK | Building Modern, in collaboration with our client.  It is a unique, but mostly simple concept and design.  However, we have learned over the years that simple, minimal details are usually less forgiving and more challenging to achieve than more traditional details and assemblies – things line up, the trims are minimal, having less ability to hide imperfections.

For the white siding material, we specified and installed prefinished cement board panels with matching exposed fasteners and 3/8″ gaps at panel joints.  In all but a few special conditions now, we detail all of our wall assemblies as rainscreens.  Even the thermally-modified wood is a rainscreen system.  The open panel joints allow water to enter and drain out via the weather-resistive barrier and flashings.  We sleep better at night knowing we have detailed and built our wall systems with the best techniques (RESILIENT DESIGN), especially when a project has minimal or no roof overhangs to shelter the facade.

New Modern House 1 - Copperwood South Elevation Construction Progress - HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Copperwood South Elevation Construction Progress

Interior Progress – New Modern House 1

We are going on about month-10 now in the process.  Trim carpentry and painting is progressing along with electrical fixture installations, cabinets, and tile.  Kevin/Rachelle Swan (clients), Chris Adams (trim carpenter, painter, floor installer, quality control expert), and Derek Mills/Chris Short (Architects-Construction Managers) have been teaming together and with the numerous trades to “bring it home”.  Exposed clear-coated double 2×10 Southern Pine beams conceal track lighting.  We have painted track reveal dark grey to camouflage the dark track fixtures.  Beams also uplight the vaulted ceiling.  All lighting, security + HVAC is controlled via owner’s smart devices (Smart Home Technology).

New Modern House 1 - Interior Progress - 3 Wise Guys - Kevin Swan, Chris Adams, Derek Mills, HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern
Interior Progress – 3 Wise Guys – Kevin Swan, Chris Adams, Derek Mills

 

Rough Grading  – New Modern House 1

During the construction stage, we considered a few alternatives to the original south-stepped landscape wall.  Ultimately, we decided to abandon the stepped-wall in favor of a new concept – a new elevated soccer plateau – achieved with many, many loads of excavation spoils from other project locations.  Coordinating the desired elevations and precise angle at plinth edges has been an effort, but will be well worth it in the end.  We think it will be a dramatic functional and aesthetic base – an extension of the modern architecture – a mediator from house to otherwise virgin landscape.  We envision the plinth as manicured lawn, and surrounding grades with wildflowers and wild-grasses for a natural, low-maintenance landscape.

New Modern House 1 - Big Boy Toys - HAUS Architecture, WERK Building Modern, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect
Big Boy Toys

 

Thermally-Modified Ash – New Modern House 1

Conceptually, the thermally-modified wood-clad east bedroom wing slides though the side of the living space, so we continued the wood from exterior through the interior living space to stay true to the concept.  The wood on the exterior will weather to grey – the wood inside should maintain this darkened effect of the Ash wood.  The burned-wood smell is evident on the finished product, but only in very close proximity.

We chose to finish the stair in clear Southern Pine.  We considered using the Ash from walls, but it is more brittle and we were afraid it may crack on installation and over time.  The pine works for the stair, as it is a nice compliment to the exposed Southern Pine beams in the adjacent living space.  We are looking forward to seeing the steel rail system and wood-burning stove installations next.

Client has been instrumental and a great partner in coordinating interior trim carpentry details, lighting fixture selections, and interior finish selections in collaboration with HAUS and the Construction Manager, WERK | Building Modern.

New Modern House 1 - Stair Detail - HAUS Architecture, Christopher Short, Indianapolis Architect - WERK Building Modern
Stair Detail

In the early fall of living in the house, Owner has confirmed that Passive Solar Building Design is no joke – the home is maintaining 70 degrees inside during the daytime (35-45 degrees outside) on sunny days without furnace.

New Modern House 1 - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Living Room Nearing Completion Daylight

 

New Modern House 1 - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Living Room Nearing Completion Nightfall

 

New Modern House 1 - Architectural Stair - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Architectural Stair

 

New Modern House 1 - Entry Bridge - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Entry Bridge at Nightfall

 

New Modern House 1 - Chopping Wood - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Chopping Wood

 

New Modern House 1 - Stair Wall - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Stair Wall (Thermally-Treated Wood)

 

New Modern House 1 - Entry Bridge - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Entry Bridge View from North Bay

 

New Modern House 1 - Entry Bridge - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Entry Bridge

 

New Modern House 1 - Bedroom Wing Elevation - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Bedroom Wing Elevation

 

New Modern House 1 - Stair Detail - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Stair Detail View from Lower Level

 

New Modern House 1 - Stair Detail - Christopher Short, Architect, Indianapolis, HAUS Architecture
Stair Detail View from Main Level

 

Stay Tuned for More Progress Photos

 

12 Oct 2016
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Modern Craftsman

Background

We met our Broad Ripple Modern Craftsman clients at the Broad Ripple Home Tour in Fall 2014 when they were volunteer docents for our Broad Ripple Bungalow project, which was one of the homes on the tour.  By all means, we were very happy when they called to begin the planning process for their craftsman-style bungalow also on Carrollton, a beautiful, walkable street lined with several excellent Craftsman-Style homes.  Having lived in the home for 20+ years, our clients didn’t want to leave but wanted a respectfully-modern, light-filled transformation to support their lifestyle for the next 20 and beyond.  The new design reflects their personalities and life-stories (who they are and how they want to live) on the inside, while the outside is a major upgrade dialing-up the Craftsman style.

Since our clients are passionate about good design, high-quality materials, and energy/resource efficiency, this project was a perfect fit for an architect-led design-build approach.    Certainly, we enjoy the design process, but also collaborating with the trade contractors and overseeing the construction.  Undeniably, a direct conduit from design to construction helps ensure the successful implementation of design vision.

We began construction in September 2016, substantially completing it in April 2018 as planned (7 months).


Project Info – Broad Ripple Modern Craftsman:

Architecture/Interior Design/Renderings: HAUS | Architecture
Photography: HAUS | Architecture (some supplemental images courtesy of Indianapolis Monthly Magazine – Tony Valainis)
Construction Management: WERK | Building Modern
Featured:  2018 Indianapolis Monthly


Media Links:

The project is beginning to get some recognition – check out these articles and blogs:

Indianapolis Monthly:  Staying Power – A Broad Ripple Bungalow Grows Up

Art of the Exterior:  When Less Is More

Photo Library: These 57 Cool Corners are Decorated in a Big Way (Modern Craftsman first floor powder room is number 54!)

 

Stair Harp Installation

Check-out the time-lapse video below.  Paul Reynolds and Derek Mills fabricated and installed the steel guardrail prior.  Then later, they came back to install the vertical stainless-steel cable-rail system.  If only it could go this quickly in real-life!

 

The Design Process – Broad Ripple Modern Craftsman

The design modifications included in this complete gut/remodel include new everything + personal touches inspired by the owners.  Exposed structure + connection hardware is a nod to Lori’s father, who worked in the building industry designing hardware.  Also, other interior details that pay homage to client interest in music, particularly stringed instruments.  We will share more of the story and design process, including interior design concepts and renderings, as the project progresses.  The interiors are what really sets this project apart.

It is important to think about the big picture but also the details.  At HAUS, first we work to establish the big-picture concepts, which are inspired by our client and particulars of place.  From there every subsequent decision is born from that concept.  Certainly, our clients are our inspiration, and therefore, they have ownership if not just the physical home but also the design solutions.  Their personalities ARE the design.

Although the construction documents are two-dimensional, we think, see, and live in three dimensions.  The image below is a ghosted version of the 3D computer model.  As can be seen, this model includes developed details, so this was near the end of the design process.  One can begin to see all the elements within the spaces, from the structural elements to the furniture pieces.  Please check back later as we’ll share more about the beginning of the design process before it was this far along!

Broad Ripple Craftsman Renovation

 

 

Breaking “Ground” – Broad Ripple Modern Craftsman

Here’s a shot of the existing house as lumber began arriving.  Our client refers to existing roof eaves as a raccoon motel.  This is because they are in disrepair with gaps allowing wildlife to camp-out.  We will be bringing this bungalow above and beyond its original Craftsman roots from a design, detail, and quality standpoint.  This preexisting roof and attic space is coming off to accommodate the new upstairs.

Broad Ripple Craftsman Renovation

Framing lumber arrived in mostly one delivery, which was helpful.  This is because the site is unique in that it shares a driveway with the neighboring property and much of the landscaping is to remain.  We managed to tuck the lumber package back  into the owner’s carport and driveway, which gave us room to set a dumpster next to the house, rather than in the front yard or street.

Broad Ripple Craftsman Renovation

Demolition – Broad Ripple Modern Craftsman

And with a few swings of the hammer, the renovation has begun!  We began by salvaging a lot of elements from the existing space.  We donated much of the existing light fixtures, plumbing fixtures, and cabinets to Habitat for Humanity for re-use, thus diverting them from going into the dumpster.  At client request, we salvaged original doors and trims for re-use in the new design.  It was not our original intent to completely demolish all interior walls and ceilings, but our framer urged us to consider it since that would streamline the process and give an entirely new interior.  Let’s do it.

PANO_20160929_161845

01 Jul 2018
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Vintage Modern Garage

Background

Our clients for the Vintage Modern Garage project contacted us in early spring 2016 to assist with the design for a new large-scale, freestanding workshop to compliment their 1950’s Midcentury Modern residence that they had just recently acquired in the Lakeside neighborhood on the northwest side of Indianapolis.  They were looking for the right architect to match their overall aesthetic initially for the garage.  In addition, they needed oversight of the primary residence renovations, including interiors.  So, HAUS assisted with an overall master plan respecting the Midcentury spirit of the original home and site.

The new garage location was to replace a former in-ground swimming pool that had just recently been removed.  The topography of the site and garage location was a challenge, but these unique opportunities usually help inspire something extra in the end product, and we saw great potential for refinement at this already established property.  This home has an intriguing story that we will let our clients tell later, but they essentially rescued the property from its prior illicit occupancy, with a prior owner extraction involving the DEA.

Before contacting HAUS, client had already hired a general contractor and landscape designer/builder.  One of the biggest project priorities was budget.  They had already begun some design scopes with the contractor and landscape company.  However, they felt they needed more help to achieve strong architectural design concepts to compliment their vision for the Midcentury Modern site.  We are happy that client invited us to help.  Helping achieve a comprehensive design vision is what we do best.

Design

When we design, we keep budget in-mind, but we have to let the ideas flow freely; we know we can always dial-back the scope or complexity.  The key is to be sure to come-up with an excellent idea.  From there, we work-out the details and see how it can fit the budget.  If the design solutions motivates the client, they may also consider increasing the budget.  For many of our projects, it can be compromise of all those options (size, complexity, quality, timeline, budget).

The workshop design solution maximized the footprint and height allowed per zoning while working to compliment the original primary structure up the hill.  The sloping topography of the site made connections between house and accessory structure challenging, requiring retaining walls which became an integral part of the architectural design solution.  Workshop and lower level of house are essentially aligned, and the former house auto court (original garage was at basement level of house) will become an outdoor garden terrace connecting house lower level to new auto workshop.

The architecture of the workshop compliments the house with the use of a shed roof that pops-up revealing a 3-sided translucent acrylic clerestory wrap that reveals the wood structure while flooding the interior with natural light.  Clear glass overhead doors reveal the vintage cars inside while allowing more views and light.  Finishes compliment the original house with gray and stained siding a match to house.  Furthermore, concrete retaining walls compliment house limestone cladding.

The initial phases of this project including most exterior and interior scopes are complete.  Our client is still continuing forward with some details on their own time.  Please check-back as we will be adding to the story.


Project Info – Vintage Modern Garage:

Architecture/Renderings/Photography: HAUS | Architecture (Chris Short + Paul Reynolds)
General Contractor:  Thrine Construction
Landscape Design/Build: Start to Finish Landscaping, Inc.


Media Links:

Photo Flip:  100 Fall Exterior Postcards from Houzz

 

Design Process – Vintage Modern Garage

Stay tuned for more updates, as we will be adding to this story, including the design phase and before-photographs.