Category: custom built-ins

13 Aug 2016
+

Midcentury Gut Job Underway

Check out progress on this Midcentury Gut Job at 81st/Springmill area.  We are really excited about this one – it is pretty much a total redo both inside and out!  Check out the latest updates on the project page.

23 Jul 2016
+

New Modern Entry Bridge Progress

New Modern Entry Bridge is progressing at Copperwood right on schedule.  Bridge spans the front clerestory bay lower level walkout which provides an abundance of natural light to the lower level.  Check out the project page for the latest comprehensive updates.  We are really looking forward to finishing the final details around mid-September 2016 on this New Modern Home in Zionsville.

02 Jul 2016
+

Scandinavian Rec Room

Scandinavian Rec Room from our Classic Butler-Tarkington Modern Tudor featured here – check it out!

“Rec Rooms can be multipurpose areas that are fit for both unwinding and working.  Versatile and low-key, Scandinavian designs can help you create a fun, bright and open space for all sorts of activities, from a game of foosball to catching-up on studying … a space your family will love!

01 Jun 2016
+

Midcentury Modern Renovation Begins

Midcentury Modern Renovation Begins in Meridian Hills Neighborhood, Indianapolis.  This 1960 original Midcentury Modern home, purchased by our clients in late summer 2015, will be a whole-home remodel, including an overhaul of just about everything inside and outside.  Please check-out the project page here, as we will be posting key updates along the way!

17 May 2016
+

20 Awesome Examples Of Wood Ceilings

HAUS project featured in Contemporist article about wood ceilings – check out these amazing projects from around the world!

Wood is a great way to add warmth to an interior, but it doesn’t just have to be about floors and furniture. Here are 20 examples of interiors that put wood on the ceiling.  Check-out number 7.

 

01 May 2016
+

Featured in May 2016 Indy Monthly

HAUS’ Broad Ripple Bungalow is featured in May 2016 Indy Monthly Magazine.  Check out the spread here and scroll down.  Check-out the online magazine link here.

Tinker Time

San Francisco transplants turn the interior of a 1920s bungalow into their own Broad Ripple playground.

By Taylor Ellis

Photography by Tony Valainis

When Deborah Jacobs and Alan Leerkamp moved to Indy from California, they captured Broad Ripple’s playful, artsy spirit in their bungalow just south of the main strip like they’d been living in the area for years.  That’s what happens – even if unintentionally – when great creative minds collaborate:  Deborah, an art director and designer who has refurbished the homes of Google employees, partnered with HAUS, a local architecture studio with a contemporary edge, on a six-month renovation project.  “They really get it,” says Chris Short, principal architect at HAUS.  “Most people don’t have those kinds of [creative] interests and skills.  We were speaking the same language.”

02 Apr 2016
+

Housequake

Housequake – A new spring 2016 photo of home + studio – check out the project story here.

 

07 Mar 2016
+

Creative Shared Bedroom Ideas for a Modern Kids’ Room

Creative Shared Bedroom Ideas Kids Modern Bedroom

Check out this article at Freshome.com which features HAUS custom shared kids’ room – project photo #15.

By Neila Deen 

Laughing…crying…playing…fighting. A shared sibling bedroom is a beehive of activity and needs. And that means there’s a lot for parents to tackle when creating their kids’ shared bedroom. With twice the amount (or more) of evolving personalities and necessities, it’s often a daunting task for parents to accommodate storage, space and the individual style of each child.

Here are some helpful tips to overcome common design challenges and create a happy and functional room for your young roommates.

Creating a Boy and Girl Shared Room

Designing a room for a brother and a sister doesn’t have to be challenging. In fact, it’s probably the easiest challenge to overcome when planning a shared room.

Your first step is to select an underlying color palette for the main elements of the room (walls, rug, furniture) that is gender neutral…and, if they’re old enough to chime in, that each sibling gives the thumbs up. Color combos such as white and grey, turquoise and white or a mix of primary colors work well for both boys and girls.

To complement your underlying palette, layer complementary colors and patterns on top of that. For example in a grey and white room, try accenting with yellow accessories. For patterns, lean towards stripes, chevron or solids with large geometric shape(s).

When selecting furniture, opt for furniture with clean lines and that’s non-themed (steer clear of the race car or sleeping beauty beds) and pair with neutral colored essentials such as lamps and window treatments.

The exciting part of creating a super fun bedroom for your young brood is accessorizing and customizing design elements to match their budding personalities. Select design elements that make the room feel like it belongs to both of them. Personalize accessories throughout the room such as wall art or coat hooks. Marquee lights with their names or first initial add a pop of energy and excitement to any space. Likewise, subtly add gender specific themes in one or two accessories, but keep them color coordinated. For example when accessorizing with red, try a throw pillow with a red fire engine for him, and a pillow with a red flower or heart for her. Storage that is complementary to the design scheme but specific for each gender (think charcoal for boys and yellow for girls) can also seamlessly pull a room together.

Creating a Room For Different Ages

Sometimes its not just Jeremy and Sarah that you need to accommodate, but a 3-year-old Jeremy and a 4-month-old Sarah can definitely add another layer of design anxiety.

The first thing to tackle is the furniture layout. If you have a baby, chances are you’ll be in and out of the room at night to tend to the baby. If possible, place their beds in opposite corners or walls with the crib being most accessible to the door. Obviously structural elements such as windows and heaters can dictate otherwise but your design objective is to give each child the most comfortable night’s sleep without one waking the other.

Creating a play area that both siblings can enjoy, even simultaneously, is super helpful, especially for tired mommies and daddies. Floor mats, cushions and soft larger items like a rocking horse and tents are perfect to outline the area and fun for both to play in. Place your older child’s toys in accessible storage containers, but higher than the floor so your youngest can’t easily touch it.

For example, whether it’s a bookshelf, storage cube or wall unit, place baby friendly toys and items on the lower shelves. Your toddler or older child can stand and reach for the basket of Lego.

Incorporate elements that show your children their growing family. Photos of the kids together, framed handprints of when they each were newborns encourage them to appreciate their younger or older sibling while adding a warm family atmosphere to their bedroom.

Creating Ample Storage for Two or More

Finding the space in one room for twice as much furniture and storage is one of the most daunting tasks when designing a shared room. This is where your resourcefulness and editing eye need to kick into high gear. Less is definitely more in a shared bedroom, as is multifunctional and shared design.

As a baseline, selecting streamlined furniture is essential to keep the room feeling as spacious as possible and allow for storage and playing. If your kids are old enough, bunk beds are always an excellent choice. Whether L-shaped or vertical, a bunk bed is an efficient use of space and oftentimes has built-in storage underneath.

Speaking of…under the bed storage such as rollaway drawers is always helpful in creating more space and can hold seasonal or limited use items. Storage chests with cushions can be used as a seat to a play table as well as conceal a mountain of toys. A wall unit with drawers can pull double duty as a dresser and desk.

Shelving is super convenient for toy organization as it doesn’t take up a lot of space and can be placed above dressers, desks, even above the door for hardly used items. Similarly, placing a bookshelf at the foot of the bed doesn’t take up valuable wall space and may even give you another surface near the bed for a lamp or nighttime book.

For clothing, wall and door hooks are helpful for every-day go-to items. In the closet, install two rods (i.e. double hanging) so each child can have separate hanging space.

Regardless of your design challenge, when creating a shared room for your little ones if you stick to resourceful, efficient, fun and creative choices, you’ll no doubt create a bedroom your kids will love!

How are you going to design your kids’ bedroom?

Creative Shared Bedroom Ideas Kids

14 Jan 2016
+

11 Dreamy Master Suites

Article:  11 Dreamy Master Suites – Shabby Chic Master Bedroom Suite in HAUS’ Broad Ripple Bungalow featured in article, “11 Parental Suites of our Dreams” (interpretation).  Suites of differing styles from around the world are highlighted – check out the article here.

Interpreted Text Below:

11 Parental Suites of our Dreams

And if parents finally had the right to their own space for cocooning?

The Romantic Suite:

The decorative element of strength in this Shabby Chic bedroom suite is of course the raw barn door.  Sanded and whitened to match the minimalist and romantic style of the room, she separates the sleeping quarters from the spa.  The white walls and big mirrors placed behind the bed bring in a light that almost seems poetic.  We will particularly salute the ingenious sliding door system that allows for a flexible gain of space.